Slang and Jargon Souces

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Slang and Jargon Souces

American Slang Terms– slang, etiquette, some opinions and fashion do’s and don’t s.

AlphaDictionary – American dictionary of slang Drug Related Street Terms/Slang Words

College Slang Dictionary

Drug Slang Dictionary

Edwardian Slang

English Slang

Grafitti Terms

Medieval Dictionary – This is the dictionary of medieval words. It covers a lot of territory including weapons of the knight, parts of castles and medieval life in general.

Rap Terms – Terms used by Rappers and in the Rap Music industry.

Slang Language by City

The Best of British Slang

Twists, Slugs and Roscoes: A Glossary of Hardboiled Slang

Vietnam Veteran’s Terminology and Slang

Resources Menu

Research Links

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Research Links

Writing Corner is striving to be the “Resource of Writers’ Resources”.  This is essentially a links page but you will only find links to reference or research tools here.

Don’t be bashful – if you know a good link that should be added EMAIL us and we will check it out.  We know you have one or two trade secrets online you won’t mind sharing with the rest of us.

ADVERTISING

Author Self-Promotion – In addition to some beautiful promo items like magnets and bookplates, there are some really great articles of self-promotion, book promotion etc., Earthly Charms.

BABY NAMES, MEANINGS OF NAMES, NAMES

Whats In Your Name?

Belly Ballot – A large list of baby names, origins and ethnicity.  Can be broken down by boy or girl names.

BIBLE REFERENCES

Bible Answers

CALENDARS / ALMANACS

Information Please: Online Almanac Reference

Earth Calender

CASTLES AND KNIGHTS

British Titles of Noblity 

The Castles of Wales – need historical inspiration? How about the names of the various parts of a castle? This site has links to pictures for the definitions (loads slowly at times) This is the place to visit.

dMarie Time Capsule find out what happened the day you were born, or the day your hero/heroine was born.

Knighthood, Chivalry and Tournament Glossary of Terms

Odin’s Castle of Dreams & Legends – another great place to take a tour of castles and learn more about them.

COPYRIGHT LINKS

Basic Copyright Concepts for Writers — *Writers Write — The IWJ*(article)

CopyrightAct 1968 (Australian)

SUL: Copyright & Fair Use (Stanford University Libraries)

EBLIDA umbrella association of national library, information, documentation and archive associations and organisations in Eu(European information)

DICTIONARIES

RefDesk.com – This is the place to look first for the information you need.  A gigantic selection of links to dictionaries, thesauruses, language translators, almanacs, history, grammar, formatting and other information of great value to writers.

Aussie Slang Dictionary – an invaluable tool to the non-Aussie writer with the Aussie character.  Try not to get too carried away though.

Dictionary of Ballet Terms

Martindale’s “The Reference Desk”  

Yahoo Reference – Dictionaries – Slang – you will find more of the above here for various countries (mostly ex-British colonies) but you will also find sub-cultures here too (i.e. mountain bikers, gays etc…)

Semantic Rhyming Dictionary – an invaluable tool for the poet – or anyone else who gets the urge to rhyme.  Allows you to search various levels of rhyme i.e. exact match, end sounds etc.

A Glossary of Hardboiled Slang – an everything slang dictionary.

High – Tech Dictionary – Technical Terminology

Information Please: Online Dictionary and Encyclopedia

EDUCTION FOR WRITERS

Free Education on the Internet

ENCYCLOPEDIAS

RefDesk.com – This is the place to look first for the information you need.  A gigantic selection of links to dictionaries, thesauruses, language translators, almanacs, history, grammar, formatting and other information of great value to writers.

Encyclopedia.com – a free online encyclopedia.

Encyclopedia Mythica – a great fantasy/fiction writer’s reference.  Full of myth, legend and folklore information.

GAMERS JARGON

There many different types of gamers jargon.  Below are some useful links to help you find the right terms for you manuscripts.

Computer Gamers Jargon

GENERAL REFERENCE

The Internet Public Library Wikipedia

The Internet Public Library Reference Center

GRAMMAR AND STYLE

RefDesk.com – This is the place to look first for the information you need.  A gigantic selection of links to dictionaries, thesauruses, language translators, almanacs, history, grammar, formatting and other information of great value to writers.

Elements of Style – the well-known grammar and style aid now online.

Guide to Grammar and Writing – This is the Internet’s solution to Strunk and White.

GRANTS AND OTHER FUNDING

Grants.gov – Finding funding and grant resources on the Internet.

HISTORY

Archiving Early America – Digital Library, world of early America, great site

LAW REFERENCES

Oxford Handbooks Online

MEDICAL INFORMATION
(Great for researching that medical mystery fiction story)

The Virtual Dental Center

Web MD

MISCELLANEOUS    

DillWeed ~ The Online Media Resource ~ Dictionary, radio, film, museums, engines, television, telephone, and so much more.

John Hewitt’s Writer’s Resource Center

Page ONE Lists Of Resources – Incredible list of links.

Writer’s Toolbox –  Internet Resources for Writers

Literary Trivia Links

Poets and Writers – tools, funding, jobs and more

Shakespeare Trivia

Sports Trivia

QUOTATIONS

Quoteland – just what it sounds like.

Cyber Quotations: Cyber Quotes from BrainyQuote, an extensive collection of quotations by famous authors, celebrities, and news makers.

The Movie Quotes Database

SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY

Information Please: Weather and Climate

TALENT

Talent Development Resources – A wide variety of information available here, articles and snips about creativity, talent, personality, giftedness, including quotes from any famous and talented people.

THESAURI

RefDesk.com – This is the place to look first for the information you need.  A gigantic selection of links to dictionaries, thesauruses, language translators, almanacs, history, grammar, formatting and other information of great value to writers.

Roget’s Thesaurus – old, faithful basic English Language thesaurus.

Think Map – allows you to search words and create visual word maps from that word. I haven’t tried it yet but it sounds good (BTW this is a recommended writing “warm up”)

WORD ORIGINS

RefDesk.com – This is the place to look first for the information you need.  A gigantic selection of links to dictionaries, thesauruses, language translators, almanacs, history, grammar, formatting and other information of great value to writers.

Word Wizard – a great site full of word origins, quotes, insults and more. Stop by if for nothing else but the fun of it.

WRITING REFERENCES

Best Reviews – Best Reviews from Leena Hyat

Freelancewriting.com

Georgia Writers (wonderful people to work with)

John Hewitt’s Writer’s Resource Center  

National Writing Project WWW Resources – Finding funding and grant resources on the Internet.

Occupational Outlook Handbook – a great place to find information about different occupations for your characters and other research.

RhymeZone – Rhyming and word search – great source for finding that “other” word.

The Dabbling Mum.com – The on-line magazine for busy parents.

The Olive Tree Genealogy – find your ancestors or a long lost knight.. The Olive Tree Genealogy is dedicated to bringing you primary sources such as passenger lists, muster rolls, church records and more, FREE of charge.

Writing by Genre and Form 

Writer’s Way – This site is full of well organized links. If you want to find something it won’t be hard here – all links are categorized.

WritersWeekly – writer’s online newsletter, has markets and tips.

 I would like to thank David M. Somerfleck who unbeknownst to him gave me many of the links you see here.   “Thanks for sharing with Writing Corner!”

Resources Menu

Newspaper Writing Resources

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Resources Menu

Magazine Links

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Magazine Links

The magazines in the list below offer advice to aspiring and established writers.  Several of the magazines and ezines listed below are accepting submissions from new and established writers.  Some magazines and ezines are listed for the research material they provide.

Writing Corner offers this list for your use, but in no way recommends or endorses any of the magazines or ezines listed, and is not responsible for their content.

Air & Space Magazine  – flight and space travel magazine of the Smithsonian National Air and Space Museum.

American Songwriter Magazine  – covers the craft and business of songwriting, with interviews, songwriting tips, news, and a song lyric contest.

Aphelion: The Webzine of Science-Fiction and Fantasy  – forum for amateur writers to hone their skills and present their work to the public.

Arabian Horse World Magazine

Archaeology Magazine

Arizona Highways Magazine  – photography and writing about Arizona.

Artist’s Magazine, The  – resource for beginning, intermediate, and advanced artists to learn how to paint and draw better, as well as how to sell their work professionally.

Aspiring TV Writer and Screenwriter Blog  –  how do you get an internship or assistant job? How do you make connections in Hollywood? What is a script reader? How do you get an agent or manager?

Audubon Magazine

Baltimore Magazine

Bartender Magazine  – recipes, message boards, the “baroscope” (a sort of alchoholic horoscope), a bartenders’ crossword puzzle and more.

Black Enterprise Magazine  – business service publication for African-American entrepreneurs, corporate executives, professionals and decision makers.

Bloomsbury Review  – community for everyone who is interested in literature and writing.

Booklist Online selection of reviews from Booklist, a selection tool for librarians. Reviews of books for adults and children.

Career Magazine  – resource center with job openings, employer profiles, resume posting, articles, and more.

Circle Magazine, The  – quarterly literary magazine featuring poetry, short stories, and articles.

Crayola Kids Magazine  – offers a selection of storybooks, puzzles, and craft actvities.

Creative Screenwriting  – magazine for writers of feature films and television.

Crime Magazine – provides a brief biography and a timelines of real crimes.

Dance Magazine

The Dabbling Mum.com – The on-line magazine for busy parents

DesertUSA Magazine  – travel and recreation guide to the American southwest and its deserts.

Discover Magazine monthly magazine of science and technology; their wonders, their uses, and their impact upon our lives.

Ellery Queen Mystery Magazine – brings you the best in short mystery fiction.

Emergency Medical Services Magazine  – Monthly publication for emergency medical technicians, paramedics and other EMS providers.

Entrepreneur Magazine  – features daily news, chat rooms, message boards, interactive coursework, the SOHO Mall and more.

Exceptional Parent Magazine  – providing information, support, ideas, encouragement and outreach for parents and families of children with disabilities, and the professionals who work with them.

Exploratorium Magazine Online: Paper  – articles on origami, making paper airplanes, creating handmade paper, and more.

Fade In: Magazine  – film magazine for screenwriters. Interviews and articles covering the creative and professional aspects of working, writing, and sucking up in Hollywood.

Fairfield Review  – online literary magazine for Fairfield County, CT writers and students of poetry, short stories, and essays.

Family Corner

Family Tree Magazine  – for beginners as well as more experienced family historians and family heritage hobbyists.

Flash Fiction Online – complete story in 1000 words.  To serve flash fiction readers and writers with a professional, sustainable market for flash fiction stories. To promote the general population’s reading of great short stories in general and of great flash fiction in particular.

Foreign Policy Magazine  – a leading quarterly of international affairs.

Fortune Magazine  – market and business news updated throughout the day, feature columns, screening tools, and more.

Girls’ Life Magazine  – magazine for girls ages 8 to 15.

GQ Magazine Fashion, sports, women, journalism, fitness and more for the modern man.

Happy Woman Magazine  – we think so you don’t have to.

Harper’s Magazine  – includes a preview of the current issue and the last three months of the Harper’s Index.

Hello! Magazine  – photos and features about royals and celebrities.

The Internet Movie Database (IMDb) – the world’s most popular and authoritative source for movie, TV and celebrity content.

Irish Dancing Magazine  – monthly international, full colour magazine devoted to Irish Dancing. From Riverdance to absolute beginners. Subscribe from the website.

Just Laugh magazine  – features humorous columns, comics, links, and more that are all aimed squarely at the funny bone

Kepler’s Books and Magazines  – independent bookseller since 1955 featuring new and selected titles handpicked by staff, online ordering, and author events calendar.

List a Day – over 1,800+ unique issues about email newsletters that we thought was worthy of your attention.

Literary Times, The  – complete program of services for readers and writers of romantic fiction. Also find the latest info on your favorite authors.

Mad Magazine  – includes madimations and madness of the week.

Magazine Publishers of America (MPA)  – industry association for consumer magazines, representing hundreds of companies, publishing thousands of titles.

Marketing Journals and Magazines  – links to marketing and related journals or magazines, provided by the Marketing and Marketing Research group of Tilburg University.

Make-Up Artist Magazine

Modern Humorist  – daily humor and satire magazine.

Ms. Magazine  – feminist magazine founded in 1972 by Gloria Steinem. Now woman-owned and operated by Liberty Media for Women, LLC.

NanoTechnology Magazine  – window into the emerging technology whose awesome power mankind will acquire, for good or evil, very early in the next century.

National Geographic Magazine

National Geographic Kids  – fascinating facts, interesting kids and cool games. All you need to bring is curiosity

National Geographic Traveler Magazine  – subscription information, travel resources and summaries of current features.

National Parks Magazine  – an award-winning, full color magazine that offers spectacular photographs and articles on national parks

New Frontier Magazine  – New Age consciousness magazine

Newslink Magazine from the American Journalism Review.

Parade Magazine

Parents Magazine  – offering fun and informative information for young parents and families.

PC Magazine

PEN America  – journal featuring award-winning fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and translation, as well as symposia on topics of concern to writers and readers alike.

Pen & Ink  – Philippine literary journal dedicated to providing a venue for writers and artists who want to share their works with a sympathetic audience.

Pif  – dedicated to publishing quality poetry and short stories by new and emerging writers. Book, CD, movie reviews and political commentary also welcome.

Poets & Writers  – focuses on the source of literature, providing support and exposure to writers at all stages in their development.

Pointe Magazine  – source of information for a career in ballet.

Police Magazine  – a resource for the street cop.

Potluck Children’s Literary Magazine  – publishes poetry, stories, book reviews, and artwork from writers and artists ages 8-16.

Qwerty  – lit-zine for readers, writers and other dysfunctional personality types.

Readers Digest Magazine

Renaissance Magazine  – articles on the history of the Renaissance and Middle Ages for Arthurian fans, medievalists, roleplayers, and re-enactors.

Rhapsody in Black  – showcasing up and coming African-American writers and artists.

Rolling Stone Magazine  – includes current cover story and the table of contents from the print mag, as well as exclusive online content.

Romantic Times reviews and news about romance novels. Includes author biographies, writers’ resources, and more.

Science Fiction and Fantasy World

Science Fiction Weekly

Science Magazine global weekly journal of research which serves the scientific community as a forum for the presentation and discussion of important issues related to the advancement of science.

Screenwriter’s Utopia

Script Magazine  – includes contests, live chat events, and online classes.

Skeptic Magazine  – The Skeptics Society and Skeptic magazine investigate claims by scientists, pseudoscientists, and pseudohistorians on a wide variety of theories and conjectures

Slipstream  – yearly anthology featuring the work of both new and established writers.

Smithsonian Magazine  – magazine of the Smithsonian Institution that explores art, history, and science.

Speculations  – for writers who want to be read.

Star Magazine  – entertainment news, celebrity features, gossip, and fashion.

Stone Soup  – the magazine by young writers and artists.

Storyteller Magazine  – Canadian quarterly short story magazine which welcomes new writers.

Surfing Magazine  – includes magazine ordering information, forecasting, weather information, photo/video gallery, and more.

Time Magazine

Time For Kids  – version of the popular news magazine for children.

Time Magazine: The Year In Pictures  – looks at the most interesting photos of 2000.

Topics Online Magazine  – for learners of English as a second or foreign language to express their ideas with writings and illustrations. Also has a section for teachers that discusses technique and methodology.

TV Guide Magazine  – feature articles, reviews, gossip and more.

Women Today Magazine  – features on fashion, beauty, health, childcare, career and religion.

Victoria  – includes articles and subscription.

Web del Sol  – experimental, literary, mainstream, international poetry and fiction, novel excerpts, interviews, essays, author web sites, writers’ resources, and more.

Western Horseman Magazine

Write Markets Report  – publish magazines and an annual directory of writers’ markets

Writers Digest

Writers Post, The  – features stories, essays, and poetry, with an emphasis on Vietnamese literature translations.

Zeotrope – Short  Stories and anthologies – offers many contests with prizes from $250-$1000

Resources Menu

Helpful Books

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Helpful Books

E-Publishing

How to Publish a Profitable E-Mag By Angela Adair Hoy

Fiction

GMC: Goal, Motivation and Conflict by Debra Dixon

How to Publish Your Articles: A Complete Guide To Making The Right Publication Say Yes by Shirley Kawa-Jump

Self Editing for Fictions Writers  by Browne, Renni and Dave King

On Writing by Stephen King

Writing the Breakout Novel by Donald Maass

Markets

Writer’s Market – 8,000 Editors Who Buy What You Write  (always search for latest edition)

Non-Fiction Books

Carpool Tunnel Syndrome  By: Judy Gruen – Think you’re the only mother whose children turn into terrorists when you’re on the phone?  Wondering how come the authorities haven’t arrested you for being a terrible parent? You’re not alone! Judy Gruen’s new book “Carpool Tunnel Syndrome” will have you nodding your head in agreement and roaring with laughter.     Buy the Book

Freedom to Freelance  By: Rusty Fischer – From now on, whenever I receive an email from an aspiring writer who wants to know how to get started as a freelancer, or a struggling writer who needs to know how to find work, I’m going to send them an email that simply contains the URL to purchase this book and the comment: “Read It.”   Buy the Book

How to Publish a Profitable E-Mag   By: Angela Adair Hoy – This book is a must have if you dream of putting out your own e-mag. It is a step by step instructional piece that will guide you through your entire publication process. Starting from.   Buy the Book

The Well-Fed Writer By: Peter Bowerman – The Well-Fed Writer is a must-read for anyone considering a career as a freelance corporate writer. It provides step-by-step instructions and suggestions for establishing a career in this field, whether or not you’ve had any previous experience. If you’re looking for an easy-to-read, get-started-quick guide to a career in corporate writing, Peter Bowerman’s book is a great resource.   Buy the Book

Writing for Magazines: 12 New Things Writers Must Do Today to Make Money  By: Meg Weaver – Would-be magazine writers need to meet the new demands of the marketplace, Weaver says.  Her book, “Writing for Magazines:  Twelve New Things Writers Must Do Today To Make Money,” tells us how.     Buy the Book

Proposals

Write the Perfect Book Proposal: 10 That Sold and Why, 2nd Edition by Deborah Levine Herman and Jeff Herman

Publishing

How to Publish Your Articles: A Complete Guide To Making The Right Publication Say Yes by Shirley Kawa-Jump

How to Publish Your Nonfiction Book by Rudy Shur

Self Publishing

How to Publish a Profitable E-Mag By Angela Adair Hoy

Earthly Charms – Self-Promotion

Synopsis

The Dreaded Synopsis – Elizabeth Sinclair

Resources Menu

Unblocking Your Muze

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Unblocking Your Muze

250 Words at a Time

by Mia Zachary

There you are. It’s your favorite time of day; you’re in your preferred spot on your preferred chair in front of your laptop. After flexing a few times, your fingers descend to the keyboard. You take a deep, cleansing breath and- Just check email right quick, maybe post “Don’t bother me, I’m writing” on Facebook, then click on this one article link…

Bet you wish you had a Muze.

Now, you’ve moved to a different spot, with a different chair but now you have your preferred word processing program open and a stack of printed pages beside you. You take a deep, frustrated breath and- Barely resist the urge to burst into tears or smack your forehead onto the keyboard in case that will help…

Looks like your Muze is out to lunch.

So, here you are yet again. The cushion of your preferred chair is permanently shaped like your butt. You don’t favor any spot right now except your bed with the snuggle blanket. But there’s no time to sleep because you got a five page revision letter. You take a deep, panicked breath and- Continue to stare at the jumbled words on the screen…

Where the hell is your Muze?

Does any of that seem familiar? Yeah. It happens to me at some point in every single novel! But let me tell you something about those fickle and elusive bright ideas.

The Muses were Greek goddesses and patrons of the arts and sciences. They inspired all creative artists, especially poets and philosophers— Calliope’s symbol was the writing tablet. Those fortunate to be inspired by the Muses were held in the highest esteem. No wonder so many writers anxiously wait for brilliance to strike so they can collect awards, starred reviews and big fat checks.

Unfortunately, the Muses were mythical beings. Only perspiration begets inspiration and, as a published author with deadlines, you can’t wait around. Writer’s Block is a recurring mental disorder caused by your Muse taking off for an extended vacation on a tropical beach, leaving you in a state whereby the damned words just won’t come.

My name is Mia Zachary and what I’m sharing with you has been learned from frequent and painful experience, from the hundreds— yes, hundreds— of times I’ve hit an obstacle and had to work around it, jump over it, bust through it, avoid it or accept it with ill grace. In other words, I know of what I speak.

I BELIEVE that writer’s block can happen anytime in your career – be it your first novel or your 50th; that I’ve experienced writer’s block as many as 10-20 times per book; that having writer’s block totally stinks on ice, that getting around/over/through writer’s block should be fun.

“The creation of something new is not accomplished by the intellect but by the play instinct acting from inner necessity.  The creative mind plays with the objects it loves.” – Carl Jung

If you’re in it for the long haul, if writing is what you do in life or what feeds your passion, then eventually you’re going to run up against writer’s block. It can happen at any— and every— stage of your career. But is it on the page or in your head? The first step in overcoming writer’s block is to acknowledge the pink elephant on your keyboard before you can get rid of it. And in order to get rid of it, you have to figure out what put it there.

It could be a small, temporary block brought on by being tired or distracted or simply not being in the mood. It could be that you haven’t done enough research or preparation, so you’re stopped by not knowing what needs to happen next. Maybe you’re stuck, feeling like there’s no spark to your writing, in which case you may not have done extensive enough character work.

Longer and larger blocks are most often caused by non-writing related issues. It’s hard to be creative when you’re sock or bone weary from lack of sleep. Don’t dismiss a lack of time as being responsible for your block. Another very real cause could be depression, either emotional or clinical. (One of the dumbest things I ever did was try to force myself to write after losing my father and my job in the same week.)

  • Don’t panic— Writers’ block can often be self-perpetuating… and self-fulfilling. Take a deep breath and say, “Writers write.”
  • Be realistic— Don’t set deadlines or goals you’re going to have to kill yourself to meet. Know your process and limits.
  • Don’t be so critical— Comparing your work to others or punishing yourself makes things worse. Repeat, “I have worth.”
  • Give up perfection— Do the best you can at the time, then let it go. You can always edit later, but you can’t edit blank paper.
  • Focus on the positive— What is good? What is working? Be proud of yourself and every word you get from brain to page.

We all have setbacks. The trick is to look at them as opportunities to reassess and regroup. The difference between giving up and quitting is perspective. Giving up is only a temporary situation, an opportunity to learn, so that we can start again and do things differently. Quitting is permanent. And I hate being a quitter.

In September 2010, I was feeling stuck, guilty and frustrated. Maybe it was the new-to-me genre; perhaps confusion over what I wanted the book to say, or maybe the Life that kept interrupting my efforts. Whatever, I needed help with this latest bout of writer’s block. And that’s when it hit me:

block/blăk -noun 1. An obstacle
block/blăk -noun 3. a child’s toy for building activities

There are two ways to look at writer’s block. The first is as an obstacle. You want to write, but you’re not writing or you can’t write. You feel aggravated, angry, frustrated and afraid. And the more you don’t write, the more you fear that you can’t write, that you’ll never write again. This can lead to hopelessness and depression.

Another way to look at writer’s block is as a toy that facilitates building activities. It really is okay to take time off. If forcing yourself to write just makes you more miserable, then give yourself a break and do something fun.

“Ah”, you say. “This is where she got the idea for Writing Blocks Idea Dice®!” Yep. By letting our creative mind play around a bit, we increase the probability of discovering a unique perspective that will lead to a breakthrough. So, a great way to deal with writer’s block is to roll the Writing Blocks® and see what happens when you play with story building!

Kaizen is a Japanese term that literally means “good change.”  Pronounced kigh-zen, it refers to an ancient Zen philosophy that prescribes “constant, small, gradual improvement;” Kaizen is baby steps, “one day at a time.”

If the page is empty because you feel anxious or overwhelmed, don’t ask, “How can I write 280 pages?” or “How am I going to write an Award-winning manuscript?” or “How am I going to finish this by the end of the week?” The problem with big goals is that they send the person into fear, and fear diminishes creativity.

Instead ask yourself, “How can I write one page today?” One page doesn’t sound like very much, now does it? One page in standard manuscript format is 250 words and freewriting 250 words each day will get you into a creative mindset.

Freewriting is just what the word suggests. Start with the first thing that pops into your mind and write, without stopping, without editing spelling, punctuation, or grammar. Do not worry about “rules.” Think of it as play time. Allow yourself to write junk. Be silly. Have fun. Dig deep. It doesn’t have to make sense. Tell your internal censor to shut up.

The hardest part is to keep writing, to not stop until the time is up. But that’s what you have to do because Freewriting only works if you can allow yourself to get caught up in the momentum. So here are the rules: Don’t say No. Don’t reject or deny information. Don’t ask questions, edit or judge. Trust yourself to be with your writing.

Once you do, your Muse will finally show up with wine, chocolate and an idea or three.

Resources Menu

Reconsider Hand Writing

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Reconsider Hand Writing

By Mia Zachary

Novelist Robert Stone said: “I write in longhand in order to be precise. On a typewriter or word processor you can rush something that shouldn’t be rushed — you can lose nuance, richness, lucidity. The pen compels lucidity.”

Another novelist who goes old school is Neil Gaiman, author of American Gods and Neverwhere, writes his first drafts in longhand using fountain puns and moleskin. “One reason I like writing by hand is it slows me down a little, but it also forces me to keep going: I’m never going to spend half a day noodling with a sentence to try and get it just right, if I’m using a pen. I’ll do all that when I start typing.”

The most obvious argument for returning to pen and paper is that writing by hand eliminates- or at least minimizes- the inevitable distractions of e-mail, instant-messaging, digital games with flying pigs and web-browsing for everything except research.

I eventually make my way to the PC or to my laptop, but hand writing has some superior benefits to composing on the computer:

  • Writing by hand keeps the emphasis where it needs to be — on getting the words right, not on fonts, margins, or program settings
  • Writing by hand can get ideas out faster and simplifies the effort of organizing ideas
  • And, most importantly, hand writing acts as a powerful reminder that a draft is a just a draft, not a polished work ready to submit.

Hand writing compels you to move forward across an entire connected gesture and integrates three distinct brain processes—visual, motor, and cognitive. Writing by hand requires executing sequential finger movements activate brain regions involved with thought, language and short-term memory—the mind’s system for temporarily storing and managing small pieces of information.

That’s especially true for visual learners like myself, I always remember things I wrote myself better than I remember things that were typed. I’ll easily recsll which side of the paper it was written on, what shape my notation formed and how my words appeared. It may seem trivial to writers who prefer electronic mediums, but I have been able to locate many a late night ‘great idea’ simply by envisioning where and how and why I scribbled my notes the way I did.

The human brain has several distinct regions that process visual information, auditory input, emotions, verbal communication, etc. Although these regions communicate with each other, when presented with multi-faceted information, each region has its own processes to complete first. When you’re writing, spatial relations between various bits of information are created in your brain.

So what point am I trying to make? Why am I asking you to reconsider hand writing? Because when you write something down, our brain can’t tell that you’re not actually doing that thing. Envisioning doing something can “trick” the brain into thinking it’s actually doing it. This means that brainstorming, creative visualization and just plain daydreaming help us as writers to craft settings and characters, emotional scenes and action sequences. Then handwriting these elements triggers the brain to believe “so let it be written, so let it be done” Thus handwriting helps us to turn those daydreams into a cohesive literary work.

Even before we begin the physical act of writing, our brains are putting some degree of effort into evaluating, prioritizing and organizing the information we are imagining. That process helps to install ideas more firmly in our minds, leading to greater recall down the line. Writing by hand strengthens the process by which creative information is stored in our memory.

For the past couple of years, I have signed myself up for National Novel Writing Month- 50k words in 30 days. Each year I procrastinated, got distracted , became frustrated and didn’t ‘win’. Until 2012. That’s the year there weren’t enough plugs in the cafe and I had to resort to using an ink pen and a notebook… I finished the month with 49, 410 words, 95% of which were handwritten and 80% of which were crafted well enough to keep in the manuscript. Drafting my novel this way felt amazing, liberating and most importantly productive.

There is great value in writing slowly and taking time over ideas, as well as in scribbling as fast as your hand allows, to capture your thoughts. Grab your pen and give yourself permission to write whatever you can come up with. Just dump your thoughts and ideas straight onto the paper. Feel free to scribble, doodle, jot notes in the margins and squeeze extra sentences between the lines. Writing by hand encourages focus on the story process and brings the writer neurologically and psychologically closer to the work itself. But, if you’re anything like me, you probably need to work on your penmanship 🙂

Stephen King wrote Dream-catcher all in longhand using “the world’s finest word processor, a Waterman cartridge fountain pen.” He says, “First of all, writing longhand was physically easier for me, because of the location where I can work. But also, it brought the act of writing back to this very basic level, where you actually have to take something in your fist and make the letters on the page… It slows you down. It makes you think about each word as you write it, and it also gives you more of a chance so that you’re able– the sentences compose themselves in your head. It’s like hearing music, only it’s words. But you see more ahead because you can’t go as fast.”

Resources Menu

Submission Tracking

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Submission Tracking

By Linda S. Dupie

Recently a writer asked me how I keep track of my submissions, this is something I hadn’t thought about often, but something I do day after day.

There are as many ways to track your submissions, as there are writers, for simplicity we’ll look at three of the most common systems I have found while talking to writers. Some writers use their computers, others use index cards, notebooks, and some write the information on the files they keep for each project. Others use all of the above.

Whatever system you choose, make it work for you. When I first began, I was terrible about writing down where I sent my work. I thought I could keep it straight in my head. In the beginning, I tried every way but what worked best for me. I am a detail-oriented person, I like to have information available wherever I am, and I like it to be portable. I like to use file folders; I have a file for the project and a file for the publication. When I finish a project and choose a market I write that market on the front of the project file with the date submitted and the editor. I also place a copy of the manuscript and cover letter in that file. For the Publication file I place the writer’s guidelines and a copy of the cover letter in the file, and write the title of the project and date submitted to the publication on this file too. This system makes it easy to see what I have submitted, whether I look at the publication or project file. This system works well in the office or home but is not very potable. For portability, I use a notebook and index cards.

Organizing A Submission Notebook
I know many writers who use this inexpensive and portable way to track their submissions. The most common set up I have seen is the seven-column format. For example, your columns may look like this:

[Title][Magazine Publisher/Editor][Word Count][Date sent][Date Returned][Published][Pay Date/Amount]

As you send out each project fill in the appropriate columns, and as you hear from the publications fill in your open columns.

Using Index Cards
Index cards are as simple to use as the notebook. One advantage to index cards over the notebook is your ability to reorganize them. If you were to look in my box of index cards, you would see five categories:

1. Project (Index card used)
2. Publication (Index card used)
3. Outstanding Submissions
4. Ready To Submit
5. Published

I use two index cards similar to the way I use file folders. On one index card, I write the project name with word count, publication name, editor and date sent. On the second card, I write the publication name, contact information, and the title of the project and date sent. I keep the publication cards in alphabetical order at the back of the box. Then I have a section for Outstanding Submissions also in alphabetical order; as I receive responses I either move the cards to the Published category or to the Ready To Be Sent category. For a simpler approach to this system freelance writer Carol Sjostrom Miller does this, “When I finish a piece, I write the title on an index card. On the back of the card, I list possible markets for the piece. Then when I’m ready to submit, I write the magazine I submitted to and the date on the front of the card. If I get a rejection, I just cross off the market and put the next one beneath it, and keep going until it gets accepted…I just file the cards alphabetically by title.”

Using Your Computer
If you do the majority of your writing at the computer this may be the best and easiest way to track submissions. Using a database program like Access or your word processor with a table inserted allows room for more information and cross-referencing.

A database program like Access allows you to add columns that your notebook doesn’t have the room for such as the address of the publication and the time you spend on the project. You also have the ability to cross-reference your work. For example, you have the publication entered into the system you can cross reference the manuscript to the publisher to eliminate entering your information twice.

There is no one right way to track your submissions, be as detailed as you want. The key is to find the system that best suits your needs.

Resources Menu

Publishing, Writing Terms, Acronyms

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Publishing, Writing Terms, Acronyms

Note: The majority of these terms came from the glossary in How To Publish Your Articles A Complete Guide to Making the Right Publisher Say Yes”  by Shirley Jump

A

acquiring editor – The person at a publication who has the power to make article-buying decisions.  The editor who performs this job may not have this actual title, but may instead have the title of editor in chief, managing editor, section editor, submissions editor, or executive editor.

advertising schedule – The calendar for advertisers that details when ads need to be placed for particular issues of a publication. This schedule often runs parallel to the editorial calendar.

all rights – A type of rights, granted in a contract, that gives the publisher legal permission to reproduce the article, or do anything else he wants with it, forever. The author of the article can never resell that particular piece to another publication.

angle – The defined approach taken in an article by the writer. Also called a slant, this is one facet of the larger topic on which the writer has chosen to focus.

AP style – The preferred writing style of the Associated Press. This is the predominant style used by newspapers. The details for this style–which include the formatting of numbers, capitalization, abbreviation, etc.–are found in the Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual.

APA style – One of two main styles used in academic papers, the other being MLA style. APA style is established by the American Psychological Association. Information on this style can be found in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

art – The industry term for any graphics, photographs, or other images that might accompany an article.

ASCII format – Also known as text only, this format strips a file of all formatting–boldface, italics, etc.–and converts it to a single-spaced, plain document that can be read by most software programs.

assignment – An article that is given to a writer by an editor, with a specific deadline. Assignments usually result from query letters and are accompanied by a contract or a letter of agreement.

attachment – A file attached to an e-mail message. With the number of viruses floating around, most editors don’t want attachments. They would prefer you to save your article as an ASCII (text only) file and paste it into the body of the e-mail message.

audience – The readers of a specific publication. These are the people you are directly trying to reach with your article.

audience profile – An analysis of the average reader of a targeted publication. Compiled using demographics and a market analysis, an audience profile helps the writer determine exactly which angle to take with the article.

author biography – A list of a writer’s credits. Also called an author bio, most are a page in length and list only the most relevant or prestigious publishing credits. See also curriculum vitae.

author copies – Copies of a publication that are given to the author of an article printed in that issue. See also tear-sheet.

  

B

banner – The title and publication date of a newspaper, magazine, or other periodical. The banner appears on the front cover of the publication.

beat  – A subject area or industry that is assigned to a newspaper staff reporter. For instance, the reporter can be assigned to report on all crime activity, on political happenings, or on specific news for one town or region.

billboard paragraph – The paragraph that sums up the general angle of an article, providing the essential points that the piece will cover. This is also referred to as the nut graph or theme graph.

body – The main portion of an article. This is where the writer provides solid information, answering the reader’s questions and illuminating the subject. The body follows the lead and precedes the conclusion.

byline – The name of the author as printed at the top or end of an article.

    

C

catalog envelope – An envelope that measures 10 inches by 13 inches. Because this envelope is large enough to enclose a long article and keep it flat during mailing, it is perfect for a submission package.

Chicago style – The style set by the University of Chicago. Most consumer publications use either Chicago style, detailed in The Chicago Manual of Style, or AP Style when making decisions regarding punctuation, spelling, abbreviation, and other elements of writing style.

circulation – The number of people who buy and/or receive a given publication. This can be either a closed circulation or an open circulation.

clips – Copies of published articles submitted by a writer to an editor. Usually, a writer includes two or three photocopied samples of work with asubmission package or query letter to demonstrate his experience in a particular area of writing.

closed circulation – Readership that is limited to subscription or membership. This is the case with many trade journals and academic journals. See also circulation;open circulation.

contract – The formal written agreement between a writer and publisher that defines the rights and responsibilities of each party. The contract should spell out what rights the publication is buying, along with the deadline for the article; any kill fee; any extra material the editor wants the writer to provide, such as art or a sidebar; and other important terms.

contributing editor – An honorary editor who also provides articles for a publication. Contributing editors are usually given a position on the masthead, and are often recognized experts in a given field

copy – Actual lines of writing. This is the text in an article or other piece of writing.

copyeditor – The person at a publication who is in charge of correcting and proofreading articles. This editor makes changes in the copy and double-checks it for grammatical errors, spelling problems, and other possible mistakes.

copyright – The legal overall right granted to an author or publisher for ownership of a written work. Under this ownership comes a number of specific rights, including the exclusive rights to print, sell, distribute, or translate a work. Putting a copyright notation on your work reminds others that it is your creation.

copywriting – Providing copy for corporations or marketing and advertising agencies. This can range from the writing of press releases to that of brochures and website material, depending on the needs of the client

cover letter – A short letter written to an editor to spark his interest in an article. The cover letter is accompanied by a copy of the already-written article. If the article has not yet been written, the writer sends a query letter instead.

curriculum vitae – A summary of an academic’s educational and professional background.  Usually, a vitae should be only a couple of pages in length and list only the most relevant and prestigious credentials.

   

D

defamation – Damage of a person’s reputation, character, or good name via something that is written (libel) or spoken (slander).

demographics – Statistics that profile specific characteristics of a human population, such as age, gender, income level, level of education, and region of the country.

dramatic, television, and motion picture rights – The right to sell an article or story for dramatic adaptation. Writers who have written human interest articles should try to retain these rights when signing a contract with a publication in case other media representatives are interested in the piece.

    

E

editor – The person at a publication who works with the writer, shaping the article and making it fit the publication. The editor also gives out assignments, sends out contracts or letters of agreement, and serves as the writer’s main point of contact. See also acquiring editor; copyeditor; editorial assistant; editor-in-chief; managing editor; section editor.

editorial – A first-person consumer or academic article that expresses one individual’s view of a topic. These pieces are usually less than 900 words in length and are sometimes called op-eds when they are written for newspapers.

editorial assistant – The person at a publication who helps an editor by making photocopies, filing, etc. The editorial assistant is the first to see unsolicited material and usually makes the first decision regarding the material’s appropriateness for the publication.

editorial calendar – A publication’s internal schedule in which the editors lay out their themes for the coming year’s issues. These calendars are generally created at the end of the year. Writers can request a copy of the editorial calendar along with the writer’s guidelines, or can search for the calendar online. Often, the editorial calendar is the same as or runs parallel to the advertising schedule.

editorial lead time – The amount of time between an article’s deadline and its publication date. This can vary from two to nine months, depending on the publication.

editor-in-chief – The person at a publication who oversees the editorial staff and ensures that all articles fit the publication’s editorial focus. The editor-in-chief has the final say over everything that runs in the publication.

electronic rights – A blanket term that encompasses all reprints of an article in electronic form–on websites, in online magazines, in CD-ROMs, in databases, etc. Any of these existing technologies, as well as any emerging technologies, can be lumped into this category.

e-query – An electronic query. An e-query is less formal than a traditional mailed query, and gets to the point of the letter faster. The language can be somewhat less formal but should accomplish the same goals as a regular query letter.

e-submission – An electronic submission. In general, these are pasted into the body of an e-mail (to fend off potential virus attachments) in ASCII (text only) format.

evergreen – A story or article that is recycled year after year, and is usually run to coincide with certain seasons. Almost every consumer publication carries some type of evergreen, whether it is an annual story on weight loss or one on Christmas baking.

e-zine – An online magazine. Some of these have print counterparts, but predominantly, they are limited to web distribution.

    

F

fact checker – A staff member employed by a publication to check the facts in every article before it is printed. Fact checkers use the source list submitted by the writer to verify the quotes, statistics, and other information that appear in the article.

fair use – A provision in the copyright law that allows for limited copying of published works without permission. Because the law is subject to different interpretations, it is generally best to avoid quoting fromcopyrighted material.

feature article – An article that is presented as a special attraction in a magazine, newspaper, or journal. This piece is usually the cover article, meaning that there is a mention of it on the cover of the publication. It is similar to a news story, and is usually written in the third person. In an academic journal, a feature article is designed to provide in-depth, comprehensive information on breakthrough thinking and its application in the reader’s world.

fiction – A story invented by the imagination. Can include elements from real life. Example: A story you made up about your dog.

filler – A short article of 200 words or less that does exactly what its name implies–it fills a space. Depending on the publication, fillers can range from news stories that don’t merit feature treatment to humor pieces, anecdotes, puzzles, jokes, and poems. These articles are usually written in third person and represent one of the best opportunities for a new writer to break into a publication.

First North American Serial Rights – The rights most commonly granted in a contract. Also called First North American Serial Rights (FNASR), these rights grant the publisher of a periodical (a serial) the exclusive right to print an article first. After these rights expire, the writer is free to resell the article.

first person – Writing that has the “I” viewpoint, meaning that it is seen from the writer’s point of view. First-person writing is used often in personal essays, humor pieces, and other articles that describe the writer’s direct experiences. This style builds a relationship with the reader, as if the writer were telling the story to a friend.

first serial rights – The rights most commonly granted in a contract. Also called First North American Serial Rights (FNASR), these rights grant the publisher of a periodical (a serial) the exclusive right to print an article first. After these rights expire, the writer is free to resell the article.

FNASR – The rights most commonly granted in a contract. Also called First North American Serial Rights (FNASR), these rights grant the publisher of a periodical (a serial) the exclusive right to print an article first. After these rights expire, the writer is free to resell the article.

format – The manner in which a submitted article should be physically set up on the page. This information is often found in the writer’s guidelines, and covers such parameters as margins, line spacing, and font. When in doubt, use the standard one-inch margins, double-spacing, and an easy-to-read font like Times New Roman (12pt) or Courier (12pt)

    

G

genre – A French word meaning sort or kind. A distinctive type or category of written work; epic, tragedy, comedy, novel, science-fiction, mystery, young adult, biography, etc. Example of use: “I write in the mystery fiction genre.”

    

H

header – The information printed at the “head” of a submitted article, running along the top of the page. The header should include the article’s title or a keyword for the title, the writer’s last name, and the page number.

headline – The title of an article. This short line should be kept to seven words or less, and use strong, active phrasing to encapsulate the piece and attract the attention of the reader. It is sometimes followed by a “subhead” that further explains the focus of the article.

homogeneous readership – A readership in which everyone shares common beliefs and interests. This is often found in trade journals and other publications that are distributed to readers who work within the same field, but may also be found in small local newspapers.

hook – The opening of an article or query letter that draws the reader in and interests him in the material.

how-to article – A consumer-oriented article that provides step-by-step information on completing a physical or creative project–fixing a car, planting watermelons, or decorating a cake. Usually written in second person, these articles can range widely in word count.

human interest article – An article that touches the heart of readers. These are often stories of people overcoming tragedies, learning from setbacks, or caring for others

humor piece – An article designed to entertain people and make them laugh. Most humor pieces are written in first person and run no longer than 1,000 words in length.

     

I

in-house – Within a specific publication’s staff. Editors, for instance, may refer to “in-house style, “or specific articles may be written “in-house”–by the staff of the publication.

interview – A conversation conducted by a writer for the purpose of eliciting facts and statements form another individual.  Interviews may be conducted in person, on the phone, by e-mail, by postal mail, or by fax.

invoice – A bill sent to a publication by the freelance writer of an article after the piece has been completed and approved. Writers should always submit an invoice so there is a paper trail for all business transactions.

     

J

jargon – Language that is used by a particular group, profession, or culture, especially when the words and phrases are not understood [meaningless] or used by other people such as “typesetters’ jargon”

    

K

kill fee – A fee paid to the writer of an article if the publisher changes his mind and decides not to use the piece. Not all publications have the budget for kill fees.

     

L

lead – The opening paragraph of an article. There are many different types of leads, but every lead should outline the story that follows and inspire the reader to read further.

lead time – See editorial lead time.

lead time – The amount of time between an article’s deadline and its publication date. This can vary from two to nine months, depending on the publication.

letter of agreement – The letter from the editor buying or accepting the submitted or proposed article. Sometimes, this letter is used in lieu of a contract. When that is the case, it is important to make sure that all the usual terms of the contract are spelled out in the letter.

libel – A written statement that damages a person’s reputation, character, or good name. The statement can appear in a letter, in an article, or even in a posting on an e-mail list or bulletin board. See also defamation; slander.

lifestyle section – The section of a newspaper or other publication that deals with gardening, books, home interiors, food, and other topics that are not hard news.

     

M

managing editor – The person at a publication who coordinates the different departments–such as the editorial department, art department, and typesetting department–to maintain a smooth production process and meet deadlines.

masthead – The list of staff members–including editors, designers, and more–usually printed in the beginning pages of a magazine or newspaper.

MLA style – One of two main styles used for formatting academic papers, the other being APA style. MLA style is the one preferred by the Modern Language Association. Information on this style can be found in the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing.

morgue – The industry term for a newspaper’s archives. A morgue usually has print or microfiche copies of articles that reporters can use for background research.

motion picture, television, and dramatic, rights – The right to sell an article or story for dramatic adaptation. Writers who have written human interest articles should try to retain these rights when signing a contract with a publication in case other media representatives are interested in the piece.

multiple submission – The practice of sending out one article to more than one publication at the same time. This is also called a simultaneous submission.

    

N

news story – A consumer-oriented article that provides serious coverage of a topical subject. Written in third person, these articles generally run 200 to 1,500 words in length, and rely on at least three sources to provide unbiased coverage.

newsletter – A short collection of articles–usually four to eight pages in length–designed to provide quick information about a subject, giving readers an easy way to stay current on trends or literature. There are four main types of newsletters: consumer, professional, marketing, and association.

newspaper – A publication that is issued on a daily or weekly basis, and contains current news, editorials, features, and usually advertising.

niche – A well-defined area of interest or audience that is addressed by a publication. Often, secondary magazines hit niches by focusing on a specific industry, region, hobby, or profession.

non-fiction (nonfiction) – A factual account of a person, place, thing or event. Must be completely true. Example: An article that you wrote about how to buy a skate board.

nut graph – The paragraph that sums up the general angle of an article, providing the essential points that the piece will cover. This is also referred to as the nut graph or theme graph.

     

O

off the record – Comments made by an interview subject that are not part of the formal interview.  Comments made off the record should not be printed by a writer without permission from the interview subject.

one-time rights – Rights granted in a contract that allow the publication to print an article only once. This is the best deal for the writer but is not very common.

op-ed piece – A first-person article that expresses the writer’s opinion on a particular topic. Formally called an opinion-editorial, these articles usually run 400 to 600 words in length. Some op-eds offer a supporting viewpoint on an issue that was covered in an earlier article; others are written to inform readers about issues facing society or the neighborhood.

open circulation – Readership that is not limited to subscription or membership In general, publications found on newsstands have an open circulation. See also circulation; closed circulation.

opinion-editorial – See op-ed piece.

outline – A written summary that details how a proposed article will be constructed. Sometimes submitted with a query letter, the outline gives the editor a thorough picture of the research that has thus far been gathered, the interview subjects that will be contacted, and the angle that the writer will take. Large-circulation publications often require outlines or detailed query letters.

    

P

payment on acceptance – A type of payment plan in which the writer is paid for his article when it is submitted to and approved by the editor.

payment on publication – A type of payment plan in which the writer isn’t paid for his article until it appears in print. Because an article may not appear in print until months after its acceptance, this arrangement is not as beneficial to the writer as payment on acceptance.

periodical – A magazine or journal published at regular intervals such as weekly, monthly, or quarterly.  Also called serial.

personal essay – A first-person consumer-oriented article on either a personal problem that the writer has faced and overcome, or a meaningful event. Sometimes referred to as a personal experience piece, these articles generally run 400 to 1,000 words in length

photo feature – An article that is light on writing and heavy on photos, with the text serving only to explain the graphics. In general, the photographer or a staff writer is assigned to write the text for a photo feature.

pitch – A letter or conversation in which a writer tries to persuade an editor to buy his article.

plagiarism – The act of copying another person’s work and passing it off as your own.

press kit – A folder–provided by a company, organization, or association–that provides information on the group itself. Such kits usually include industry statistics and lists of potential interview subjects, as well as explanations of industry terms and trends.

print rights – A publisher’s rights, granted by contract, to print an article on paper, but not to distribute it in an electronic manner or post it on a website or e-zine.

publisher – The person at a publication who oversees the entire operation.  At some publications,  the publisher may also serve as editor-in-chief.  Also, the business entity the edits, produces, markets, and otherwise makes available a printed and/or electronic publication.

    

Q

query letter – A letter of inquiry sent to a publication by a freelance writer as a means of proposing an article idea to the publication. The query letter is designed both to sell the idea of the article and to convince the editor that the writer has the knowledge and skills necessary to complete the article. See also cover letter.

query package – A package sent to a publication by a freelance writer for the purpose of selling an article idea. The package generally contains a query letter; published clips; and a self-addressed, stamped envelope; and may also include an outline of the article and an author biography. See also submission package.

    

R

refereed journal – An academic journal at which all submitted articles are rigorously examined by an editorial review board before being accepted. Because the standards of refereed journals are so high, most new academic writers have greater success submitting their work to non-refereed journals.

reprint – An article that previously appeared in one publication, and is later printed in another publication.

reprint rights – The rights, granted in a contract, that permit the publisher to sell an article to another publication after it has appeared in the first one. These rights are also referred to as reprint rights.

round-up – A short, consumer-oriented, third-person article that compiles responses from a variety of people on one subject, or in answer to a particular question. These articles generally run from 500 to 1,000 words in length. Sometimes, these articles are referred to as surveys and incorporate statistics, such as a percentage of respondents who gave one answer over another.

     

S

SASE (SAS) – Self Addressed Stamped Envelope —When asked to include an SASE with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

SASP – Self Addressed Stamped Postcard —When asked to include an SASP with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

second person – Writing that has the “you” viewpoint by addressing the reader. This is common in how-to articles–pieces that give advice or information.

second serial rights – The rights, granted in a contract, that permit the publisher to sell an article to another publication after it has appeared in the first one. These rights are also referred to as reprint rights.

secondary magazine – A medium-sized consumer magazine that focuses on a specific niche, or area of interest, and therefore covers a secondary market. Secondary magazines usually fill the gaps left by large magazines, which try to address the needs of many different kinds of readers.

section editor – An editor in charge of one section of a publication, such as health or books.

serial – A magazine or journal published at regular intervals such as weekly, monthly, or quarterly.  Also called periodical.

Self Addressed Stamped Envelope – When asked to include an SASE with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

Self Addressed Stamped Postcard – When asked to include an SASP with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

service piece – A consumer-oriented third-person article that falls into the how-to category, but goes further than just explaining how to do something by informing, educating, and advising the audience about an important issue or life skill like investing, working, or making a purchase. A service piece generally runs 500 words in length or more.

sidebar – A short piece that accompanies an article and provides helpful hints, resources, or a summary of the article’s main points. These boxes of information are set apart from the main article and are usually less than 200 words in length.

simultaneous submission – The practice of sending out one article to more than one publication at the same time. This is also called a multiple submission.

slander – A spoken statement that damages a person’s reputation, character, or good name. See also defamation; libel.

slant – The defined approach taken in an article by the writer. Also called an angle, this is one facet of the larger topic on which the writer has chosen to focus.

slush pile – The term used to describe the stack of unsolicited articles–articles that were not requested by an editor. Articles in the slush pile are usually read by an editorial assistant.

solicited (Requested) – A solicited article has been requested by an editor, usually in response to a query letter sent by a freelance writer.

source list – The list of sources used by a writer in researching an article. The list should include contact information for all interview subjects, as well as bibliographic data for each website, book, newspaper, or other publication from which the writer gleaned information for the article. This list is often submitted to the publication’s fact checker so that he can verify all information.

staff reporter – A writer hired by a newspaper to cover a particular beat. In the early days of newspapers, this person was sometimes called a “stringer.”

style sheet – A sheet that details the style and format preferred by a publication. Academic publications usually use either MLA style or APA style. Consumer and trade publications usually prefer either AP style or Chicago style.

submission guidelines – The set of rules for submitting articles to a particular publication. Sometimes referred to as submission guidelines, they provide specific information about formatting, grammar, and style, and also provide payment information and contract terms. It is important to always study a publication’s guidelines before submitting. By writing in the style prescribed by the publication, you can increase your chances of acceptance. Writer’s guidelines can be obtained by directly contacting the publication itself, and in some cases may also be found on the publication’s website or the website of Writer’s Market. See also  writers guidelines.

submission package – A package that is sent by a freelance writer to a publication for the purpose of selling an already-written article to the publication. Generally, this package includes a cover letter; a copy of the article; published clips, if any; and, in the case of an academic article, a curriculum vitae. See also query package.

syndicate – An agency that sells the same article simultaneously to different newspaper outlets. These articles are then printed in numerous publications throughout the country. Most syndicate writers are established experts who have built up years of experience in their chosen area of focus.

      

T

tear-sheet (tearsheet)- An original copy of a printed article “torn” from the publication’s pages. Most editors send writers complete copies of the publication, known as author copies, instead of tear-sheets.

technical article – A third-person article, written for a trade journal, that covers issues which the typical layman’s publication wouldn’t examine in its articles. Technical articles vary in length, depending on the material being covered, and always use industry-specific language.

television, dramatic, and motion picture rights – The right to sell an article or story for dramatic adaptation. Writers who have written human interest articles should try to retain these rights when signing a contract with a publication in case other media representatives are interested in the piece.

text only format – Also known as ASCII format, this format strips a file of all formatting–boldface, italics, etc.–and converts it to a single-spaced, plain document that can be read by most software programs.  You can save a document as text only in MS Word, or use Notepad to create the document.  See ASCII format

theme graph – The paragraph that sums up the general angle of an article, providing the essential points that the piece will cover. This is also referred to as the nut graph or billboard paragraph.

third person – The most distant of all writing forms. In this type of writing, “he,” “she,” and “they” are the pronouns used. Third-person writing is generally employed in objective articles such as news stories and feature articles, and is sometimes used in interview/profile pieces as well. It is appropriate when the writer is trying to present important information or show an unbiased front.

tips article – An article that provides readers with hints and advice in a quick, easy-to-read format. Specifically, these pieces tell the reader how to do something better or more economically. They are common in consumer magazines.

topic – The subject of an article. This should be narrowed and tightened until the writer develops a specific angle that will appeal to the readers of the target publication.

trade journal – A magazine or small newspaper published specifically for people in certain businesses or professions to increase career and business knowledge. Unlike an academic journal, a trade journal is designed to help readers better run their business or perform their job.

    

U

unsolicited – Not requested. An unsolicited article is sent by a freelance writer to a publication without being asked to do so. It then remains in a slush pile until someone–usually an editorial assistant–is able to review it and determine its suitability for the publication.

    

V

No terms at this time.

    

W

website (web-site, web site) – A server computer that makes documents available on the world wide web (www).  Most commonly thought of as a group of informational pages belonging to a person or organization with a domain name [their dot-com address] that are available on the world wide web.  See also our computer terms, jargon and acronyms page.

wire service – A service, such as Associated Press, that electronically distributes news and articles to newspapers and magazines around the country. For many publications, buying a story from a wire service costs a fraction of the price paid to a freelance writer, making wire service stories an economical choice.

word count – The number of words in the article, not including the headline or byline. Because space is such an important commodity in the article world, it is vital to provide the editor with an accurate word count that comes within a few words of the requested count.

work for hire – A contractual arrangement in which the employer or other person or company for whom the writing is prepared is considered the author, and owns all of the rights to the work. Many staff reporters and copywriters sign such contracts, preventing them from reprinting any of the work they produce while employed with that company.

writer’s guidelines – The set of rules for submitting articles to a particular publication. Sometimes referred to as submission guidelines, they provide specific information about formatting, grammar, and style, and also provide payment information and contract terms. It is important to always study a publication’s guidelines before submitting. By writing in the style prescribed by the publication, you can increase your chances of acceptance. Writer’s guidelines can be obtained by directly contacting the publication itself, and in some cases may also be found on the publication’s website or the website of Writer’s Market. See also submission guidelines.

       

X

No terms at this time.

    

Y

No terms at this time.

    

Z

No terms at this time.

    

Resources Menu

Publishers Websites

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Publishers Websites

This list will continue to grow as we receive your links.  As with Editors and Agents links, always Google the agency and see if there are any bad reviews or warnings against the publishing house.

Addicus Books

American-Book Publishing

Arsenal Pulp Press – publisher of literary fiction, westerns, romances, new age, literary and art studies, political/sociological studies, and more.

Ballantine Publishing Group – publisher of sci-fi and fantasy, romance and women’s fiction, mysteries and multicultural titles (Random House).

Bantam Dell

Barbour Publishing

Bethany House

Doubleday Publishing

Harlequin
•  Mills Boon (Harlequin Australia)
•  MIRA
• Check the Series drop-down for the series type

HarperCollins

ImaJinn Books

Kensington – Zebra – Pinnacle Publishing Corporation. – independent full-range publisher of romance, true crime, western, nonfiction and fiction.

Macmillan

MIRA Books (Harlequin)

MIRA UK

Mystic-Ink Publishing

Penguin/Putnam – Penguin Group (USA) publishes under a wide range of prominent imprints and trademarks, among them Viking, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, The Penguin Press, Riverhead Books, Dutton, Penguin Books, Berkley Books, Gotham Books, Portfolio, New American Library, Plume, Tarcher, Philomel, Grosset & Dunlap, Puffin, and Frederick Warne

Publishing Mills AudioBooks – Grammy Award winning audiobook publisher. Catalog includes bestselling fiction, non-fiction, biography, SF, romance, children’s, and more.

Santa Monica Press: Publisher of How-to and Offbeat Books

St. Martin’s Press

Simon & Schuster

Thorndike Press

Tor – Science Fiction / Fantasy

Tyndale House Publishers

Waterbrook Multnomah Publishing – Christian books

Zondervan

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