Youth Writing Markets

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Youth Writing Markets

Absolute Write – Excellent resource and Market (No pay)

AdLit.org – Adolescent Literacy offers news and reviews of the best of books for teenagers. Includes advice and strategies for teachers and parents.

Children’s Writing Resource Center

Creative Arts In Action – Writing club and workshops that help your child learn to love to write.

Creative Writing for Teens-Find tips, news, activities, a chat room, a selection of young authors’ works, plus creative writing & homework help. Submit your work for a chance to be published online. Market

CyberKids-Art and writing accepted. Ages 7-12 Market

CyberTeens-Fiction, Non Fiction, and Poetry. Ages 13-19 Market             

Education World : Curriculum: Ten Tips for Young Writers.

EZeeWriter.com – EZeeWriter helps the beginning and veteran writer along the word path.

Fear of Writing – Fear of Writing is for anyone who experiences that familiar thud in the pit of the stomach when they visualize sitting down to write.

FundsforWriters-Funds for Writers provides a source for struggling writers seeking funds for their dreams. Funds consist of grants, awards, fellowships, markets and contests to open doors for writers making a living through their passion for words.

Insight – A Christian magazine for teens. Writer’s guidelines INSIGHT; 55 W. Oak Ridge Drive; Hagerstown, MD 21740-7390.  Paying Market

Journal For You -This site offers the how, who, what, when, where, and why journaling is for you.

Markets for Young Authors – young writers looking for a place to publish their work. Also an aid for teachers.

MerlynsPen.com – “Fiction, Essays, and Poems by America’s Teens”  Market

Modern Language Association – MLA Bibliographic format. Standards for research papers.

New Moon Girls –  For young girls 8 to 14 years. Market

Stone Soup Magazine-Now in its 28th year, Stone Soup brings young readers thought-provoking stories, heartfelt poems, and beautiful art by their peers worldwide. Budding writers and artists are encouraged to create and submit their own work. Market

Story Book Online – Loads of things to do from writing stories, read original stories, create interactive stories and much more.

SynergEbooks  E-book Market
Includes books ‘By Teens For Teens’ in it’s regular publishing program.

Teen Ink: Written By Teens Market
A web site, a monthly print magazine and a book series written by teens for teens. Now in its 13th year.

Teen Writers Resources – for teen interested in writing Science Fiction and Fantasy

Teens Writing for Teens  – Teens Writing for Teens is a community of young adult authors writing YA fiction. We’re here to offer insight, encouragement and amusement as we live the lives of young novelists and deal with that ever-popular question, “So…aren’t you a little young to write a book?”

The e-Writer’s Place-Packed full with information. Home of the column Writer’s of the Next Generation.

Tips For Young Writers by Ralph Fletcher

Willamette Writers – an organization for published and aspiring writers of the Pacific Northwest

Write From Home – this site strives to offer work-at-home writers tips, information and resources to help you balance your writing career and children under one roof.

WashingtonPost.com KidsPost

Word Dance Magazine (Market) Accepts writing and art.

Writing to Inspire – Tips and Resources for Inspirational and Christian Writers.

Writing-World.com – A World of Writing Tips – for Writers Around the World.

Writer’s Help Desk – Answers questions about your writing and publishing needs.

Young Writer’s Society –

Resources Menu

Why E-Books?

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Why E-Books?

by Chris Randall

With thousands of writers all competing to get the favorable eye of the traditional publisher, it is not surprising that the great majority fail to get into print. Trying to compose those few words which will grab the attention of the person sitting in the selector’s chair, can be about as fruitful as picking out a seven way accumulator at a race meeting. Yet we go through these motions time and again, never stopping to ask why we contribute so eagerly to the publisher’s seat of unreachable power. But you don’t need to be told this. You have probably already experienced it yourself.

While many authors might have heard of e-books, few have yet given them the attention they deserve. E-books are not just a passing gimmick. They are, beyond any measure of doubt, the future of publishing. It might seem, at this moment in their evolution, that they are a little troublesome and not quite the same as holding a printed book in your hands, but they should not be dismissed too readily. There will come a time when an e-book is the most common form of publishing and reading. That is the unstoppable nature of advancing technology. A few years ago, the engineer would have made all his calculations on a slide rule. Today you will be hard pressed to find such an outdated object, and many children will not even know what a slide rule is. Pocket calculators have out competed them. Likewise, e-books will eventually out compete the printed page.

If you decide to take the e-book road, you will not encounter the odds normally stacked against you. Far from placing your skills and talents at the mercy of another, you will meet the pure justice of the internet world. Your e-book will stand on its own merit, and succeed or fail accordingly. Well, almost. E-books are a relatively new concept and for that reason you will not immediately find a clamoring market to purchase them. But this will change as e-books become more popular. And in any event, what does it really matter? The cost of producing an e-book spans from very little to zero. Once it has been prepared in html format, either by yourself, or by the e-book publisher, it is ready for purchase by any who are interested. This presents an avenue of distribution, which, if nothing else, is a bonus for both the unpublished and published author alike.

Expressions of distaste have been reported by some writers who believe that, because books are more readily accepted for e-book publishing, the standard is lower than for books published traditionally. There is no sustainable evidence for this. After all, do you think your work is of poor quality? Of course not. And you are no different to any other frustrated writer who wishes to get their work seen. Because a book has not been accepted by a traditional publisher, is not evidence that the book has no merit. The very nature of traditional publishing dictates that only a very small percentage of writers will be published. Every printed book comes at a cost to the publisher, so they cannot afford to publish an unlimited number of books each year. This is not the case with e-books. The cost-effective nature, and the wide scope coverage of the internet, means that there are no such restraining limits.

How does the royalty on an e-book compare to a printed book? Printed books attract royalties for the author of anything between 10% and 20%. In contrast, an e-book will never pay out such low commissions. The author can always expect at least 50% of the cover price and often more.

The author will not need to wait for payment either. Payments will be made monthly in most cases, which compares favorably to the six months imposed by many traditional publishers. Another fear expressed by some looking to the e-book market, is the confidentiality factor. Here one has to be realistic. It has sometimes been asked, “How do I know my e-book won’t be given to someone else after a customer has purchased it?” The answer is that you don’t know. No more than you know that a printed book won’t be given to a friend to read after the purchaser has read it. In fact, the chances of several people reading a printed book for the single price paid for it, is probably far greater than for the e-book, for reasons that are obvious.

There are various ways of purchasing an e-book, but all follow a basic principle. If an e-book has to be paid for, it will be impossible to access it until the credit card transaction has been completed. Once the credit details have been approved, a thank you page is shown on the web site and from there the purchaser can either download the e-book to their computer, or they can obtain access to the html pages by way of a password. Either way, if the payment is not received, the book will not be accessible.

If the e-book is simply downloaded, then the chances are that the format is the same as when you set it up on your computer. By contrast, the book which can be read on the web site, has been set in html language and will undoubtedly be displayed in a more attractive manner. It will often contain a colored background and can, on occasion, include pictures and graphics. However, it should be noted that any inclusion of features that are beyond simple text might come at a cost that you will be asked to cover. This is not unreasonable. The e-book publisher has no guarantee that the book will sell and make a profit.

Payments for e-book sales are usually made monthly. When the transaction is completed, the credit for the sale will have gone into the web site owner’s credit account. Reputable credit card service providers will have set up a money back guarantee to the purchaser which can only be redeemed within a stated time period. Although this might seem like an easy option for e-book customers to buy a book, read it and redeem their money, the fact is that the great majority of people are straightforward and honest, so this occurs only rarely. It should never be considered as a deterrent to publishing an e-book. At the end of the month the web site owner will usually send you a statement by email which will show you whether or not any sales have been made. If necessary, a copy of the web site account will be made available also, so that you can check on the transactions throughout the month. These procedures will vary from one publisher to another, or might even be negotiated at the time of first publishing.

An important factor in the sale of e-books is the “packaging”. By packaging we mean “the way it is presented”. This presentation package comes under the heading of marketing. The successful sale of any product is relative to the manner in which it is marketed, and the author should have knowledge of this. It is in the author’s interests to describe the written work in as attractive a “package” as possible. If a prospective purchaser is going to buy a book where it is not possible to thumb through the pages first, then the sales pitch (the introduction) must make the customer want to buy. One way to do this is to take an appealing passage from the book and use it as the introduction, but because the author has the greatest knowledge of their own work, it should not be too difficult to explain it in an interesting way using your writer’s artistic flair.

As things are at present, the purchaser of an e-book will have several options for reading it. They can read it on screen at the web site, print it out from the web site to a desktop printer, or they can download (or copy and paste) it for reading/printing off line at a later time. This is what might be described as the troublesome aspect of e-books at present, depending on the views of the customer. But we need to be ever mindful of the nature of computer and internet technology. It advances much too fast for many of us to keep up with. So there must be a time in the near future when special e-book reading pads will be made available. Rather like a small book sized, hand-held, computer screen that will fit into the pocket or handbag. With the ever-decreasing size of memory packs it is already possible for such a device to hold a thousand or more e-books, either on CD-ROM or downloaded directly from the internet.

This is the inevitable future, not just for books, but for daily newspapers, magazines, subscription reports, and any other written work that can be supplied from the internet. It would be very unwise to write off e-books as an unworthy vehicle for your artistic writing. Soon it might be the only vehicle available.

Resources Menu

To Specialize, or Not to Specialize?

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

To Specialize, or Not to Specialize?

by Mary Anne Hahn

Okay, so you’ve decided that you want to write for fun and profit, and not necessarily in that order. Perhaps you’ve already abandoned your day job to pursue your dream of the full-time writing life, or maybe you just want to test the waters part-time until you have the guts (and money) to jump in with both feet. In any event, you’ve decided that you want to start your own writing business.

Now what?

You head for the nearby library, rush to your favorite bookstore, or jump onto the Web to see what other writers are doing. And you find that there are so many opportunities “out there” for writers, it makes your head spin. “Make a Gazillion Bucks as a Copywriter.” gushes one book title. “Big Profits From Short Pieces.” promises another. Book after book, web site after web site, take you down pathways paved with gold, fortunes made from writing everything from greeting card verses to computer manuals. Your excitement builds.

Although some ideas appeal more to you than others, it is tempting to want to dabble in them all. Let’s face it, we writers are a creative lot, and eschew the thought of being tied down to a particular type of writing. Who wants to churn out press releases all day, or catalog copy, or annual reports? Variety, after all, is the spice.

Besides, why close yourself out of several money-making opportunities by concentrating on one? Couldn’t you be a sort of one-stop writer, a one-size-fits-all kind of scribe, able to satisfy whatever kind of customer calls upon you for your services? Why limit your customer base or market to a certain kind of person, or company, or publication, when you could peddle your skills to the whole world?

I subscribed for years to this very line of thinking, and my writing resume shows it. I have published over a dozen non-fiction articles, put together a newsletter or two, created a few radio spots, won a short story contest, developed training manuals and revised job descriptions. I’ve written telephone scripts, business correspondence, procedure documents and users’ guides. I am the first person my friends think of when they need a resume, and yet those same friends also expect that I’ll someday produce a string of romance novels. So I’ve had a versatile writing career, yes. A lucrative one, no.

The reason is pretty obvious, if you think of your own experience as a consumer. Certainly, many of us shop at discount department and variety stores, never knowing what kinds of bargains we might find at these places. But where do we go when we need something specific, or of high quality? The department store may or may not have a particular book we want to read, but chances are excellent that a bookstore will have it. The variety store may carry tools, but a hardware store will more likely carry exactly what we need for that fix-it project. In health matters, we go to general practitioners for routine check ups, but prefer to have specialists treat any serious conditions. Moreover, we’re often willing to pay top dollar for the expertise and reliable reputation that the specialist, or specialty store, provides.

The same holds true for people in need of a writer. The celebrity seeks an experienced ghostwriter for her tell-all autobiography, one with a track record of completing entire books and getting them published, while the political candidate needs a seasoned speech writer. Software companies want writers skilled at putting together user-friendly technical documents, while advertising agencies look for samples of creative copy. These writing styles differ as greatly from one another as, say, a watercolor from an oil painting, or reggae from a symphony—and our potential markets and customers know it. So although we might be fully capable of switching gears from one form or writing to another, few people are going to gamble on us if there is a tried-and-true specialist out there for hire.

So yes, I am advocating that one of the first things you do if you want to start a profitable writing business or career is decide what kind(s) of writing you will specialize in offering. Start out with as narrow a scope as possible—keep in mind the mechanic who works solely on Mercedes transmissions—and become the very best at whatever type of writing it is that you’ve chosen. Once you have established yourself in one area, you can always diversify into others.

At the very least, you’ll be able to write that book: “How I Made Millions as a (Fill in the Blank) Writer.”

Resources Menu

Syndication 101

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Syndication 101

How to get your foot in the door without getting it stepped on.

By Perucci Ferraiuolo 

It has long been held that an editor is a man or woman who knows exactly what he or she wants, but doesn’t know what it is.

Never is it more true than within the syndication marketplace. And, I’ve found that most editors know what they want based on what they DON’T want. In other words, they know the “junk” and are only looking for the “treasure.”

So what’s the treasure? You know. Copy that sings, grabs, shakes, and is so good it stuns. If you want syndication you’ve got to write so well that, as humorist Fred Allen puts it, it makes all other writers feel like putting their quills back in the goose.

Many times an editor won’t know how good a piece is until it is read. A good article or good column is one that immediately changes the editor’s day – and plans. Before you venture into the churned waters of syndication, though, make sure you’ve got the best product you can possibly offer – you may not get more than one chance to impress.

Many (writing) industry publications say that a great way to break into syndication is to start out writing columns for local newspapers, develop a following, and then get picked up by a syndicate. Nice if it works. Most of the time, it won’t work. Chances are that if you’re reading this (or them) you’re not working for a newspaper, are not a columnist now, and don’t have THE voice of any given region.

What you need in appealing to any syndicate (who are really column and one-shot article brokers) is a big gun. If you haven’t got name recognition, you should be writing cutting edge copy with one hand while having a finger of your other hand on the pulse of current trends, beliefs, platforms, and attitude.

So here’s the ABC’s: Choose a syndicate (heck, choose all of them). Phone them (or write) for their guidelines. And try like your professional life depends on it to get the name of the editor you will attempt to attract (the Writer’s Market has a good listing of many good and reputable syndicates).

Remember, syndicates are sales organizations and handle columns and one-shots (feature articles) like K-Mart handles merchandise. The bottom line is sales. If you don’t give them what they can sell, you won’t be picked up (given a contract). You have to become a salesperson yourself and develop solid, professional marketing techniques to close your own sale to the syndicate.

Perhaps the single most important strategy in syndication or in searching for a place in any publishing organization is to build a rapport with the editor. If you know what sports team, what restaurant, or how many kids the editor has, you’re on the right public relations road. “Nobody,” a salesman friend of mine once said, “but nobody ever buys from a salesman they can’t stand.”

Lastly, be a Don Drysdale (if you don’t know who he is, I feel older already) and pitch, pitch, pitch. “If you throw enough balls out there, you’re bound to get a few strikes,” Don said once in an interview.

But pay attention: Never, ever send a syndicate anything that is over 500-600 words (columns) and 1,000 words (features). And, always remember that syndicates sell to newspapers. If you can’t or won’t fit in there, you won’t fit in at the syndicate.

Do you have a fresh voice; a different spin on things; or march to a different beat? There’s a syndicate out there just dying to hear from you. Go ahead. Pick up your pen. And then change the world.

Resources Menu

Submitting to UK Markets

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Submitting to UK Markets

A Matter of Style

by Grady Hanrahan 

“God save the queen.”

These are the words of the British, of course, but British words known throughout the world. Less known in the United Kingdom, perhaps, are the markets that wait for eager writers to explore, conquer and reap financial awards. Our reaction to this naivete – and, as expected, a general assumption, is that North America has cornered most writing markets. This is simply not the case.

There are a plethora of markets in the United Kingdom that not only consider, but also happily accept submissions from abroad. The British people are curious people -their appetite for knowledge far exceeds the number of printed words. And they have a fascination with the world around them, which is reflected in the material on the writing markets.

George Bernard Shaw once wrote, “England and America are two countries divided by a common language.” This may hold some truth and is one of the things we must consider when submitting from North America. There are many linguistic differences that can prove difficult when writing for UK markets, especially non-fiction varieties. I have listed a few common words below:

North American
Pants
Gas
Truck
Wrench

British
Trousers
Petrol
Lorry
Spanner

Then there is the spelling debate. When writing for the British, spell like the British. Granted, there are some instances when original language and spelling are fine (e.g. literary journals). But to break into most other markets, careful attention must be taken to the use correct spellings. Below I have again listed a few differences:

North American
Center
Analyze
Sulfur
Program

British
Centre
Analyse
Sulphur
Programme

Most word processors have built-in spelling converters in which one can simply use before submitting to the UK. Or perhaps one can buy an English dictionary with Oxford being the preferred version.

Writing style and etiquette also play important roles in gaining acceptance into UK markets. The British are known for their twisted sense of humor and satirical nature, which is clearly reflected in the written material. UK fictional markets thrive on such elements and your chances of acceptance are increased if added to your submission. Adopting an “international” sense of humour in your writing is the best bet.

The same non-fiction rules apply when submitting domestically or abroad – it is best to be factual, concise and provide additional references if the subject is “foreign” to British culture. Writing about the societal cross-section of Tadpole, Indiana may sound like an interesting (and unique) subject, but will most likely fail without a proper introduction and background information.

Writing etiquette – perhaps the most important part of submitting abroad. You have spent many countless hours writing, editing and polishing your piece. So why neglect submission guidelines? UK markets sometimes have different submission procedures, i.e. cover letters, manuscript preparation and editorial policies. And the time it takes to reply to your submission will most likely be increased. Editors are busy people – be patient in your approach. As a general rule, wait at least three months before querying the status of your manuscript.

Make use of the Internet – search long and hard for relevant data on submission procedures. And always…always send proper return postage. International Reply Coupons (IRC’s) are issued by the Universal Postal Union and can be exchanged abroad for stamps sufficient for return postage providing that you send the correct number. A single sheet of postage (an acceptance letter perhaps) will cost the UK editor roughly (check prices) to send. However, I recommend sending two, if not three, to cover such costs. If buying IRC’s in the states, for example, it will cost roughly $1.15 (check current rates at with USPS) for each coupon. A small price to pay for success.

And finally, take the time to research unfamiliar areas unique to the UK. Most non-fiction markets deal with British or European subjects, places and events. Granted, there is a fascination with other parts of the world and included, in some aspect, in most publications. As mentioned before, the literary markets tend to be a bit more flexible and accept a wider range of subjects. However, one must be informed and educated before submitting to non-fiction markets, especially political, social, entertainment and business publications.

Writing is a difficult business with many variables. The number of writers entering the scene is increasing causing domestic publications to become deluged with submissions. This leaves us in search of different avenues to submit – and anxiously waiting– are the UK markets. Take extra time to research the markets and pay close attention to style.


For more information on UK markets, write to or browse the following:

The Writer’s Handbook
Macmillan Publishers, Ltd
4 Crinan St, London N1 9XW, UK

Jacqui Bennett Writers Bureau http://jbwb.co.uk/smpress.html

The BBR Directory http://www.bbr-online.com/directory/index.shtml

Resources Menu

Selling to Children’s Markets

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Selling to Children’s Markets

By Jennifer Drewry

One of the first questions a new children’s writer asks is, “I have a story, who can I sell it to?” In the children’s market there are many places.

Some of the best places to sell your work are children’s magazines. However, don’t just haphazardly send them their, buy a copy of the magazine and read it. Get to know what the magazine is looking for, the style of the writers. There are many magazines for children out there and they are all different in what it is they are looking for.

“The Writer’s Market” is a great book that comes out annually which has all the places where you could possibly sell your work. Go through it and look at what the publishers are looking for, that may generate some ideas for you. A trip to your local bookstore is helpful too, ask the manager if you could have some of the old catalogues from book publishers. They throw them out anyway, and by skimming through them, you can get a sense of what that particular publisher is looking for.

Writer’s block, which hits all of us from time to time, can be elevated by a simple trip to the children’s section of your local library. You want to write for kids, read kid books. Pick out a handful of books that attract you. Then as your reading them ask how did they grab your eye? Was it the cover, the title? Was the story good? What would you have done differently if you were the author?

While you’re at the library, ask the librarian when story time is and volunteer for it. Reading to young children is an excellent way to connect to that “writer within”. You can also volunteer at your local schools, either in a classroom or in the schools library. Furthermore, while your there, ask the librarian questions about what’s been popular with the kids. It is a small sampling, but you may get ideas about what some of the current trends are. Remember though, the trends change with the age group. Five to six year olds may LOVE animal tales, but seven to nine year olds may like adventure stories. Remember your audience and write for them.

One last suggestion which may help you, find a writers critique group. Ask at the library if they know of any in your area. Try local colleges and universities. The ones you find may not be strictly for children’s writers so, maybe you would like to start one. Ask some of your friends if there interested.

Just keep writing, keep sending your stories out and keep your spirits up. There may be a few rejections in your mailbox until you finally get that acceptance letter, that YES, they are printing YOUR story.

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Science Writing

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

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Path to Self-Publishing Success

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Path to Self-Publishing Success

Time Released Email – The Often Overlooked Path to Self-Publishing Success

By Bob Baker

When the subject of e-publishing and self-publishing on the Internet comes up, the conversation usually turns to talk of .pdf and .exe files, not to mention the pros and cons of various personal ebook readers. What you don’t hear much about is the workhorse of Internet communication: basic e-mail.

There are some exceptions. A few fiction writers have received notoriety by “serializing” their novels via e-mail segments delivered over the course of several weeks. What I’ve been doing for the past nine months, though, is taking a non-fiction subject, borrowing the serialized concept, combining it with a free autoresponder service and turning it into what I believe is a fresh format: the e-mail workshop.

Let me explain how I did it – and how you can, too.

A few years ago I wrote a 72-page book called “Creating Wealth for Creative People.” It was a manual designed to help artists, writers, musicians, actors, photographers (and other people pursuing creative fields) overcome money-making obstacles and get a grip on how to market their talents. I self-published it by having the pages printed on three-hole-punch paper and placing them in a three-ring binder with a colorful cover inserted into the front sleeve.

I did the same with another book, called “The Guerrilla Music Marketing Handbook,” a more focused subject aimed at independent bands and people running small record companies. I did pretty well with both titles, selling a steady amount through free e-mail newsletters and my two web sites.

Then I started thinking more about e-publishing and the success potential of using electrons instead of paper.

The first thing I tried was offering the individual chapters of my music marketing book, along with some other music-related special reports I’d written, in a basic e-mail text format. I called them Instant E-Reports. Each one ran from 2,500 to 3,500 words long. The E-Reports were offered in a range of prices, from a single report for $4.95 to all 20 of them for $29.95. Much to my satisfaction, most people who bought my Instant E-Reports purchased all 20.

This was a good thing. Customers got them fast. I could send them quickly and for little or no cost. Everyone was happy. And I continue selling them in this format to this day (in addition to the more expensive hard copy binder versions).

Next I wanted to do something similar with my book for creative people. Unlike my music marketing book, the creativity title was made up of modules that were around 600 to 800 words each. The idea of separate e-mail lessons began to emerge. I added an Action Step to the end of each module and came up with “The Creative Success 28-Day E-mail Workshop”.

You guessed it, the idea was for the buyer to receive one new lesson by e-mail for 28 days in a row. Books can easily be bought and, after a few days or a week, set aside and forgotten. A daily e-mail lesson acts as a constant reminder to focus on the subject at hand. Customers had a much better chance of actually putting my advice into action, allowing them to connect with me as an author and view me as a credible source of information. This got my juices flowing. And the positive feedback I’ve consistently received from readers has proved me right.

What I did at first was save each lesson in a separate file. At around the same time late every evening I would log on and send the next day’s lesson. To keep my sanity, I made sure the workshop started on the first day of each month. That way, everyone was getting the same lesson on the same day. Fine and dandy, but what about the times I went out of town? Or got home late and didn’t feel like firing up the computer? Or what if someone wanted to sign up for the workshop in the middle of the month?

There had to be a better way.

That’s where a free autoresponder (sometimes called a mailbot or autobot) service came to my rescue. You’ve probably heard of them. You set up a special e-mail address for people interested in a specific type of information. For instance, you might use one to send your bio and writing samples to editors. Any time someone sends an e-mail to BobSamples@CoolGuy.com (I just made that up, so don’t try it) they will instantly receive a return e-mail with the requested information. Autoresponders allow you to send info to people without having to manually open e-mail, copy and paste, etc. It’s an incredibly useful tool.

Better yet, there are autoresponders that send a series of follow-up messages at predetermined intervals. These are great for sales messages. For example, you could offer a sample chapter of your book using an autoresponder e-mail address like FreeChapter@CoolGuy.com . You’d announce this special e-mail address on your web site, in press releases sent to the media, through discussion groups and more. Interested readers would send for the sample chapter and get it immediately by e-mail.

You could then set it up to send another message to that person two days later, containing quotes from satisfied readers and reminding him or her of how to order the book. A week later, the autoresponder could send a follow-up e-mail that contains a list of links where your book has been reviewed online. You get the picture.

Well, I decided to use an autoresponder for my 28-day course, but not in this manner. I didn’t want to make the e-mail address public knowledge (since I charge $19.95 for this workshop), but I very much wanted to use the follow-up e-mail capabilities. So I loaded up each daily lesson into 28 separate e-mails designated to go out in a certain order over the course of four weeks.

Now, as I get orders for the workshop, I log onto my autoresponder account and manually enter the customer as a new prospect. The first day’s lesson is sent immediately, and for the next four weeks that customer automatically gets the daily lessons … and he or she receives them whether I’m online, driving my car, playing pool or sleeping. Now that’s making good use of technology.

So, how do you set up an autoresponder? Your web host may be able to help you set one up, perhaps for an extra fee. But there are also some excellent free services available. Here are two of them: http://www.GetResponse.com .

So there you have it. Yet another option of self-publishing your words via the Web. Using autoresponders gives you a fresh, time-released method of distributing your craft. It’s worked successfully for me. Perhaps it could do the same for you. 

[editor’s note:  Make sure you set your autoresponder to respond once a day to incoming email – it’s possible that another autoresponder will respond and it can fill up you email in a matter of minutes]

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Market News–All Genres

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Market News–All Genres

Reading True Romance By Michael Y. Park

Publisher’s Weekly – Latest reviews, interviews and market news

Bridges Magazine – Bridges offers a unique concept in today’s magazine industry that appeals to both readers and writers. One half of the magazine is dedicated to readers and offers dozens of book reviews, the latest news about favorite authors, upcoming releases and book/author spotlights. Flip the magazine over and you will find articles of interest to both experienced authors and beginning writers that includes industry news, interviews with top editors/publishers and columns focused on writing.

The Write News

WoodenHorse Publishing – Up-to-Date Market Facts for Writers

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How To Be a (Shiver) Reporter

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

How To Be a (Shiver) Reporter

by  Linda Sherwood

Looking for a career as a newspaper reporter? Or just looking for some extra money while you wait for the first royalty checks from your promising book to start coming in? Try taking a walk to your local newspaper office.

It is unlikely you will be able to snag a job at a large, daily paper without a college degree or years of experience, but you can snag a permanent or semi-permanent job at a smaller newspaper without formal training. Requirements for reporters at these smaller papers are less stringent. While you won’t get rich working at these smaller papers, it is a great educational experience and it can be a steady paycheck.

After my second child, I decided to give up my full-time job as an editor for a daily paper. On my first day of being home, I wandered into the offices of the local weekly paper. Intending to leave my name and resume in case they ever need an extra hand, I walked away with a part-time job that I was able to do primarily from my home.

Reporting requires a bit of flexibility. You don’t work a 9 to 5 schedule. You may have to cover sports events or meetings that occur in the evening or on the weekends. It is possible to make these events a part of your regular life and not infringing on your home life. For example, I go to my library’s story hour. I take my children with me, along with a notebook and camera. My children enjoy the story hour. I snap a couple of pictures for the paper. I take notes on the event and end up with a photo story for the paper.

The best part about working for a small paper, most likely a weekly, is its flexibility. You can learn the ins and outs of all the various aspects of the business. You can write the stories, take the photos, edit copy, layout the paper and even design ads. Your ability to do a number of different tasks is the best training you can get when you decide to move up to a larger paper.

There are a few basic tenets you should know if you want to write for a newspaper be it a daily or a weekly. Writing for newspapers is a style of writing all its own. There is absolutely no room for the reporter’s opinion. Both sides of the story need to be told.

The newspaper style has changed since the 8th grade journalism class that taught you to write in an inverted pyramid. The inverted pyramid style dictated the most important elements be told first. The least important items were relegated to the end. This was done so the last paragraph could be cut off if it was necessary to allow the article to fit in the allotted space. Often the last few paragraphs were throw away to offer flexibility in the layout of the paper. Today, most papers are laid out using a computer and the inverted pyramid is no longer necessary. Today, it’s still important to keep the important elements in the story. However, it is no longer necessary to add “fluff” at the end of the story. After all, if the paragraph is “cuttable,” why use it?

Another 8th grade journalism myth is that you have to use the “5W1H” in the first sentence. For the uninitiated, 5W1H is the basic questions a journalist should answer in an article. Who? What? Where? Why? When? How? Many of those elements, especially the when element in a weekly paper, can be inserted deeper into the article.

Often, the first sentence will determine whether the reader continues to read the rest of the article. For some stories, a “teaser” opening sentence is more appropriate than the bare facts. The opening sentence should pique the reader’s interest. It should make them want to know more and make them want to read more.

For example, last spring I wrote an article about bears coming out of hibernation and raiding the bird feeders of area residents. The community I write for was also waiting the much anticipated opening of its first (it’s a very small community) fast food restaurant. The annual “beware of bears” article was able to take on a new spin and become fresh based on the happenings in the area. My opening line was:

“After waking up after a long winter’s nap, bears in the area aren’t waiting for Lake City’s newest fast food restaurant to open. Instead the hungry bears are finding the next best thing, bird feeders.”

The next paragraph was a straight explanation of the problem. I quoted residents who had bear raids on their bird feeders. I quoted a wildlife expert on how to prevent bears from raiding bird feeders.

In general, try to make the opening line an attention getter. It doesn’t have to be humorous, but it should make the reader who is scanning the headlines want to know more.

If you want to write for your newspaper, invest in a copy of The Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual. The book is updated yearly and runs about $15 for a new edition. You may be able to get a used edition from a college bookstore. Used by most newspapers, it sets the guidelines for capitalization, abbreviation, spelling, numerals and usage. It will tell you to spell out the numbers one through nine, but to use numerals for anything higher than 10. It will tell you whether you need a space or a hyphen when you use “half” in combination with another word such as halfback, half brother, and half-baked. It can give you the exact name for standard initial agencies like the FBI, AFL-CIO and AMVETS. It will tell you whether traveling should be spelled with one ‘L” or two.

When you write the article, use short paragraphs and short sentences. When the article is converted into columns, long wordy paragraphs lose the interest of the reader. One sentence can be a paragraph in journalistic writing.

A few other basics to newspaper writing may seem obvious. Meet deadlines. Question facts. Get the facts straight. Verify names and their spellings. Verify dates and places. Use accurate quotes. When using numbers, verify the numbers add up. If there are five people involved, make sure you list all five names. If the budget is made up of 20,000, make sure the way it breaks down adds up to $20,000.

Remember, especially when working for a small paper, that you may need to talk to your source again and again. If your work isn’t accurate, the source may not be willing to talk to you again.

Do you need a college education to be a reporter? It depends on your goals. If your goal in life is to be a journalist, then yes, you do need a college education. If you want to be a reporter until something else comes along, then a college education isn’t required. Most journalism degrees require a student to take a vast array of subjects and set a limit on the number of journalism classes allowed. Truly, a journalist is meant to be a Jack of All Trades and a master of none. A few journalism writing courses could teach you the mechanics you need to be a successful reporter without investing in a degree.

A reporter at a weekly paper with a small circulation can make $8 to 14,000 a year and a college degree may be helpful, but not required. With a relatively low income, the degree is actually not worth the financial investment. An editor or a reporter at a larger circulation paper where the salary can be $25,000 and up will require a college education. The income also makes it more feasible to invest in a college degree.

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