Submission Tracking

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Submission Tracking

By Linda S. Dupie

Recently a writer asked me how I keep track of my submissions, this is something I hadn’t thought about often, but something I do day after day.

There are as many ways to track your submissions, as there are writers, for simplicity we’ll look at three of the most common systems I have found while talking to writers. Some writers use their computers, others use index cards, notebooks, and some write the information on the files they keep for each project. Others use all of the above.

Whatever system you choose, make it work for you. When I first began, I was terrible about writing down where I sent my work. I thought I could keep it straight in my head. In the beginning, I tried every way but what worked best for me. I am a detail-oriented person, I like to have information available wherever I am, and I like it to be portable. I like to use file folders; I have a file for the project and a file for the publication. When I finish a project and choose a market I write that market on the front of the project file with the date submitted and the editor. I also place a copy of the manuscript and cover letter in that file. For the Publication file I place the writer’s guidelines and a copy of the cover letter in the file, and write the title of the project and date submitted to the publication on this file too. This system makes it easy to see what I have submitted, whether I look at the publication or project file. This system works well in the office or home but is not very potable. For portability, I use a notebook and index cards.

Organizing A Submission Notebook
I know many writers who use this inexpensive and portable way to track their submissions. The most common set up I have seen is the seven-column format. For example, your columns may look like this:

[Title][Magazine Publisher/Editor][Word Count][Date sent][Date Returned][Published][Pay Date/Amount]

As you send out each project fill in the appropriate columns, and as you hear from the publications fill in your open columns.

Using Index Cards
Index cards are as simple to use as the notebook. One advantage to index cards over the notebook is your ability to reorganize them. If you were to look in my box of index cards, you would see five categories:

1. Project (Index card used)
2. Publication (Index card used)
3. Outstanding Submissions
4. Ready To Submit
5. Published

I use two index cards similar to the way I use file folders. On one index card, I write the project name with word count, publication name, editor and date sent. On the second card, I write the publication name, contact information, and the title of the project and date sent. I keep the publication cards in alphabetical order at the back of the box. Then I have a section for Outstanding Submissions also in alphabetical order; as I receive responses I either move the cards to the Published category or to the Ready To Be Sent category. For a simpler approach to this system freelance writer Carol Sjostrom Miller does this, “When I finish a piece, I write the title on an index card. On the back of the card, I list possible markets for the piece. Then when I’m ready to submit, I write the magazine I submitted to and the date on the front of the card. If I get a rejection, I just cross off the market and put the next one beneath it, and keep going until it gets accepted…I just file the cards alphabetically by title.”

Using Your Computer
If you do the majority of your writing at the computer this may be the best and easiest way to track submissions. Using a database program like Access or your word processor with a table inserted allows room for more information and cross-referencing.

A database program like Access allows you to add columns that your notebook doesn’t have the room for such as the address of the publication and the time you spend on the project. You also have the ability to cross-reference your work. For example, you have the publication entered into the system you can cross reference the manuscript to the publisher to eliminate entering your information twice.

There is no one right way to track your submissions, be as detailed as you want. The key is to find the system that best suits your needs.

Resources Menu

Publishing, Writing Terms, Acronyms

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Publishing, Writing Terms, Acronyms

Note: The majority of these terms came from the glossary in How To Publish Your Articles A Complete Guide to Making the Right Publisher Say Yes”  by Shirley Jump

A

acquiring editor – The person at a publication who has the power to make article-buying decisions.  The editor who performs this job may not have this actual title, but may instead have the title of editor in chief, managing editor, section editor, submissions editor, or executive editor.

advertising schedule – The calendar for advertisers that details when ads need to be placed for particular issues of a publication. This schedule often runs parallel to the editorial calendar.

all rights – A type of rights, granted in a contract, that gives the publisher legal permission to reproduce the article, or do anything else he wants with it, forever. The author of the article can never resell that particular piece to another publication.

angle – The defined approach taken in an article by the writer. Also called a slant, this is one facet of the larger topic on which the writer has chosen to focus.

AP style – The preferred writing style of the Associated Press. This is the predominant style used by newspapers. The details for this style–which include the formatting of numbers, capitalization, abbreviation, etc.–are found in the Associated Press Stylebook and Libel Manual.

APA style – One of two main styles used in academic papers, the other being MLA style. APA style is established by the American Psychological Association. Information on this style can be found in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association.

art – The industry term for any graphics, photographs, or other images that might accompany an article.

ASCII format – Also known as text only, this format strips a file of all formatting–boldface, italics, etc.–and converts it to a single-spaced, plain document that can be read by most software programs.

assignment – An article that is given to a writer by an editor, with a specific deadline. Assignments usually result from query letters and are accompanied by a contract or a letter of agreement.

attachment – A file attached to an e-mail message. With the number of viruses floating around, most editors don’t want attachments. They would prefer you to save your article as an ASCII (text only) file and paste it into the body of the e-mail message.

audience – The readers of a specific publication. These are the people you are directly trying to reach with your article.

audience profile – An analysis of the average reader of a targeted publication. Compiled using demographics and a market analysis, an audience profile helps the writer determine exactly which angle to take with the article.

author biography – A list of a writer’s credits. Also called an author bio, most are a page in length and list only the most relevant or prestigious publishing credits. See also curriculum vitae.

author copies – Copies of a publication that are given to the author of an article printed in that issue. See also tear-sheet.

  

B

banner – The title and publication date of a newspaper, magazine, or other periodical. The banner appears on the front cover of the publication.

beat  – A subject area or industry that is assigned to a newspaper staff reporter. For instance, the reporter can be assigned to report on all crime activity, on political happenings, or on specific news for one town or region.

billboard paragraph – The paragraph that sums up the general angle of an article, providing the essential points that the piece will cover. This is also referred to as the nut graph or theme graph.

body – The main portion of an article. This is where the writer provides solid information, answering the reader’s questions and illuminating the subject. The body follows the lead and precedes the conclusion.

byline – The name of the author as printed at the top or end of an article.

    

C

catalog envelope – An envelope that measures 10 inches by 13 inches. Because this envelope is large enough to enclose a long article and keep it flat during mailing, it is perfect for a submission package.

Chicago style – The style set by the University of Chicago. Most consumer publications use either Chicago style, detailed in The Chicago Manual of Style, or AP Style when making decisions regarding punctuation, spelling, abbreviation, and other elements of writing style.

circulation – The number of people who buy and/or receive a given publication. This can be either a closed circulation or an open circulation.

clips – Copies of published articles submitted by a writer to an editor. Usually, a writer includes two or three photocopied samples of work with asubmission package or query letter to demonstrate his experience in a particular area of writing.

closed circulation – Readership that is limited to subscription or membership. This is the case with many trade journals and academic journals. See also circulation;open circulation.

contract – The formal written agreement between a writer and publisher that defines the rights and responsibilities of each party. The contract should spell out what rights the publication is buying, along with the deadline for the article; any kill fee; any extra material the editor wants the writer to provide, such as art or a sidebar; and other important terms.

contributing editor – An honorary editor who also provides articles for a publication. Contributing editors are usually given a position on the masthead, and are often recognized experts in a given field

copy – Actual lines of writing. This is the text in an article or other piece of writing.

copyeditor – The person at a publication who is in charge of correcting and proofreading articles. This editor makes changes in the copy and double-checks it for grammatical errors, spelling problems, and other possible mistakes.

copyright – The legal overall right granted to an author or publisher for ownership of a written work. Under this ownership comes a number of specific rights, including the exclusive rights to print, sell, distribute, or translate a work. Putting a copyright notation on your work reminds others that it is your creation.

copywriting – Providing copy for corporations or marketing and advertising agencies. This can range from the writing of press releases to that of brochures and website material, depending on the needs of the client

cover letter – A short letter written to an editor to spark his interest in an article. The cover letter is accompanied by a copy of the already-written article. If the article has not yet been written, the writer sends a query letter instead.

curriculum vitae – A summary of an academic’s educational and professional background.  Usually, a vitae should be only a couple of pages in length and list only the most relevant and prestigious credentials.

   

D

defamation – Damage of a person’s reputation, character, or good name via something that is written (libel) or spoken (slander).

demographics – Statistics that profile specific characteristics of a human population, such as age, gender, income level, level of education, and region of the country.

dramatic, television, and motion picture rights – The right to sell an article or story for dramatic adaptation. Writers who have written human interest articles should try to retain these rights when signing a contract with a publication in case other media representatives are interested in the piece.

    

E

editor – The person at a publication who works with the writer, shaping the article and making it fit the publication. The editor also gives out assignments, sends out contracts or letters of agreement, and serves as the writer’s main point of contact. See also acquiring editor; copyeditor; editorial assistant; editor-in-chief; managing editor; section editor.

editorial – A first-person consumer or academic article that expresses one individual’s view of a topic. These pieces are usually less than 900 words in length and are sometimes called op-eds when they are written for newspapers.

editorial assistant – The person at a publication who helps an editor by making photocopies, filing, etc. The editorial assistant is the first to see unsolicited material and usually makes the first decision regarding the material’s appropriateness for the publication.

editorial calendar – A publication’s internal schedule in which the editors lay out their themes for the coming year’s issues. These calendars are generally created at the end of the year. Writers can request a copy of the editorial calendar along with the writer’s guidelines, or can search for the calendar online. Often, the editorial calendar is the same as or runs parallel to the advertising schedule.

editorial lead time – The amount of time between an article’s deadline and its publication date. This can vary from two to nine months, depending on the publication.

editor-in-chief – The person at a publication who oversees the editorial staff and ensures that all articles fit the publication’s editorial focus. The editor-in-chief has the final say over everything that runs in the publication.

electronic rights – A blanket term that encompasses all reprints of an article in electronic form–on websites, in online magazines, in CD-ROMs, in databases, etc. Any of these existing technologies, as well as any emerging technologies, can be lumped into this category.

e-query – An electronic query. An e-query is less formal than a traditional mailed query, and gets to the point of the letter faster. The language can be somewhat less formal but should accomplish the same goals as a regular query letter.

e-submission – An electronic submission. In general, these are pasted into the body of an e-mail (to fend off potential virus attachments) in ASCII (text only) format.

evergreen – A story or article that is recycled year after year, and is usually run to coincide with certain seasons. Almost every consumer publication carries some type of evergreen, whether it is an annual story on weight loss or one on Christmas baking.

e-zine – An online magazine. Some of these have print counterparts, but predominantly, they are limited to web distribution.

    

F

fact checker – A staff member employed by a publication to check the facts in every article before it is printed. Fact checkers use the source list submitted by the writer to verify the quotes, statistics, and other information that appear in the article.

fair use – A provision in the copyright law that allows for limited copying of published works without permission. Because the law is subject to different interpretations, it is generally best to avoid quoting fromcopyrighted material.

feature article – An article that is presented as a special attraction in a magazine, newspaper, or journal. This piece is usually the cover article, meaning that there is a mention of it on the cover of the publication. It is similar to a news story, and is usually written in the third person. In an academic journal, a feature article is designed to provide in-depth, comprehensive information on breakthrough thinking and its application in the reader’s world.

fiction – A story invented by the imagination. Can include elements from real life. Example: A story you made up about your dog.

filler – A short article of 200 words or less that does exactly what its name implies–it fills a space. Depending on the publication, fillers can range from news stories that don’t merit feature treatment to humor pieces, anecdotes, puzzles, jokes, and poems. These articles are usually written in third person and represent one of the best opportunities for a new writer to break into a publication.

First North American Serial Rights – The rights most commonly granted in a contract. Also called First North American Serial Rights (FNASR), these rights grant the publisher of a periodical (a serial) the exclusive right to print an article first. After these rights expire, the writer is free to resell the article.

first person – Writing that has the “I” viewpoint, meaning that it is seen from the writer’s point of view. First-person writing is used often in personal essays, humor pieces, and other articles that describe the writer’s direct experiences. This style builds a relationship with the reader, as if the writer were telling the story to a friend.

first serial rights – The rights most commonly granted in a contract. Also called First North American Serial Rights (FNASR), these rights grant the publisher of a periodical (a serial) the exclusive right to print an article first. After these rights expire, the writer is free to resell the article.

FNASR – The rights most commonly granted in a contract. Also called First North American Serial Rights (FNASR), these rights grant the publisher of a periodical (a serial) the exclusive right to print an article first. After these rights expire, the writer is free to resell the article.

format – The manner in which a submitted article should be physically set up on the page. This information is often found in the writer’s guidelines, and covers such parameters as margins, line spacing, and font. When in doubt, use the standard one-inch margins, double-spacing, and an easy-to-read font like Times New Roman (12pt) or Courier (12pt)

    

G

genre – A French word meaning sort or kind. A distinctive type or category of written work; epic, tragedy, comedy, novel, science-fiction, mystery, young adult, biography, etc. Example of use: “I write in the mystery fiction genre.”

    

H

header – The information printed at the “head” of a submitted article, running along the top of the page. The header should include the article’s title or a keyword for the title, the writer’s last name, and the page number.

headline – The title of an article. This short line should be kept to seven words or less, and use strong, active phrasing to encapsulate the piece and attract the attention of the reader. It is sometimes followed by a “subhead” that further explains the focus of the article.

homogeneous readership – A readership in which everyone shares common beliefs and interests. This is often found in trade journals and other publications that are distributed to readers who work within the same field, but may also be found in small local newspapers.

hook – The opening of an article or query letter that draws the reader in and interests him in the material.

how-to article – A consumer-oriented article that provides step-by-step information on completing a physical or creative project–fixing a car, planting watermelons, or decorating a cake. Usually written in second person, these articles can range widely in word count.

human interest article – An article that touches the heart of readers. These are often stories of people overcoming tragedies, learning from setbacks, or caring for others

humor piece – An article designed to entertain people and make them laugh. Most humor pieces are written in first person and run no longer than 1,000 words in length.

     

I

in-house – Within a specific publication’s staff. Editors, for instance, may refer to “in-house style, “or specific articles may be written “in-house”–by the staff of the publication.

interview – A conversation conducted by a writer for the purpose of eliciting facts and statements form another individual.  Interviews may be conducted in person, on the phone, by e-mail, by postal mail, or by fax.

invoice – A bill sent to a publication by the freelance writer of an article after the piece has been completed and approved. Writers should always submit an invoice so there is a paper trail for all business transactions.

     

J

jargon – Language that is used by a particular group, profession, or culture, especially when the words and phrases are not understood [meaningless] or used by other people such as “typesetters’ jargon”

    

K

kill fee – A fee paid to the writer of an article if the publisher changes his mind and decides not to use the piece. Not all publications have the budget for kill fees.

     

L

lead – The opening paragraph of an article. There are many different types of leads, but every lead should outline the story that follows and inspire the reader to read further.

lead time – See editorial lead time.

lead time – The amount of time between an article’s deadline and its publication date. This can vary from two to nine months, depending on the publication.

letter of agreement – The letter from the editor buying or accepting the submitted or proposed article. Sometimes, this letter is used in lieu of a contract. When that is the case, it is important to make sure that all the usual terms of the contract are spelled out in the letter.

libel – A written statement that damages a person’s reputation, character, or good name. The statement can appear in a letter, in an article, or even in a posting on an e-mail list or bulletin board. See also defamation; slander.

lifestyle section – The section of a newspaper or other publication that deals with gardening, books, home interiors, food, and other topics that are not hard news.

     

M

managing editor – The person at a publication who coordinates the different departments–such as the editorial department, art department, and typesetting department–to maintain a smooth production process and meet deadlines.

masthead – The list of staff members–including editors, designers, and more–usually printed in the beginning pages of a magazine or newspaper.

MLA style – One of two main styles used for formatting academic papers, the other being APA style. MLA style is the one preferred by the Modern Language Association. Information on this style can be found in the MLA Style Manual and Guide to Scholarly Publishing.

morgue – The industry term for a newspaper’s archives. A morgue usually has print or microfiche copies of articles that reporters can use for background research.

motion picture, television, and dramatic, rights – The right to sell an article or story for dramatic adaptation. Writers who have written human interest articles should try to retain these rights when signing a contract with a publication in case other media representatives are interested in the piece.

multiple submission – The practice of sending out one article to more than one publication at the same time. This is also called a simultaneous submission.

    

N

news story – A consumer-oriented article that provides serious coverage of a topical subject. Written in third person, these articles generally run 200 to 1,500 words in length, and rely on at least three sources to provide unbiased coverage.

newsletter – A short collection of articles–usually four to eight pages in length–designed to provide quick information about a subject, giving readers an easy way to stay current on trends or literature. There are four main types of newsletters: consumer, professional, marketing, and association.

newspaper – A publication that is issued on a daily or weekly basis, and contains current news, editorials, features, and usually advertising.

niche – A well-defined area of interest or audience that is addressed by a publication. Often, secondary magazines hit niches by focusing on a specific industry, region, hobby, or profession.

non-fiction (nonfiction) – A factual account of a person, place, thing or event. Must be completely true. Example: An article that you wrote about how to buy a skate board.

nut graph – The paragraph that sums up the general angle of an article, providing the essential points that the piece will cover. This is also referred to as the nut graph or theme graph.

     

O

off the record – Comments made by an interview subject that are not part of the formal interview.  Comments made off the record should not be printed by a writer without permission from the interview subject.

one-time rights – Rights granted in a contract that allow the publication to print an article only once. This is the best deal for the writer but is not very common.

op-ed piece – A first-person article that expresses the writer’s opinion on a particular topic. Formally called an opinion-editorial, these articles usually run 400 to 600 words in length. Some op-eds offer a supporting viewpoint on an issue that was covered in an earlier article; others are written to inform readers about issues facing society or the neighborhood.

open circulation – Readership that is not limited to subscription or membership In general, publications found on newsstands have an open circulation. See also circulation; closed circulation.

opinion-editorial – See op-ed piece.

outline – A written summary that details how a proposed article will be constructed. Sometimes submitted with a query letter, the outline gives the editor a thorough picture of the research that has thus far been gathered, the interview subjects that will be contacted, and the angle that the writer will take. Large-circulation publications often require outlines or detailed query letters.

    

P

payment on acceptance – A type of payment plan in which the writer is paid for his article when it is submitted to and approved by the editor.

payment on publication – A type of payment plan in which the writer isn’t paid for his article until it appears in print. Because an article may not appear in print until months after its acceptance, this arrangement is not as beneficial to the writer as payment on acceptance.

periodical – A magazine or journal published at regular intervals such as weekly, monthly, or quarterly.  Also called serial.

personal essay – A first-person consumer-oriented article on either a personal problem that the writer has faced and overcome, or a meaningful event. Sometimes referred to as a personal experience piece, these articles generally run 400 to 1,000 words in length

photo feature – An article that is light on writing and heavy on photos, with the text serving only to explain the graphics. In general, the photographer or a staff writer is assigned to write the text for a photo feature.

pitch – A letter or conversation in which a writer tries to persuade an editor to buy his article.

plagiarism – The act of copying another person’s work and passing it off as your own.

press kit – A folder–provided by a company, organization, or association–that provides information on the group itself. Such kits usually include industry statistics and lists of potential interview subjects, as well as explanations of industry terms and trends.

print rights – A publisher’s rights, granted by contract, to print an article on paper, but not to distribute it in an electronic manner or post it on a website or e-zine.

publisher – The person at a publication who oversees the entire operation.  At some publications,  the publisher may also serve as editor-in-chief.  Also, the business entity the edits, produces, markets, and otherwise makes available a printed and/or electronic publication.

    

Q

query letter – A letter of inquiry sent to a publication by a freelance writer as a means of proposing an article idea to the publication. The query letter is designed both to sell the idea of the article and to convince the editor that the writer has the knowledge and skills necessary to complete the article. See also cover letter.

query package – A package sent to a publication by a freelance writer for the purpose of selling an article idea. The package generally contains a query letter; published clips; and a self-addressed, stamped envelope; and may also include an outline of the article and an author biography. See also submission package.

    

R

refereed journal – An academic journal at which all submitted articles are rigorously examined by an editorial review board before being accepted. Because the standards of refereed journals are so high, most new academic writers have greater success submitting their work to non-refereed journals.

reprint – An article that previously appeared in one publication, and is later printed in another publication.

reprint rights – The rights, granted in a contract, that permit the publisher to sell an article to another publication after it has appeared in the first one. These rights are also referred to as reprint rights.

round-up – A short, consumer-oriented, third-person article that compiles responses from a variety of people on one subject, or in answer to a particular question. These articles generally run from 500 to 1,000 words in length. Sometimes, these articles are referred to as surveys and incorporate statistics, such as a percentage of respondents who gave one answer over another.

     

S

SASE (SAS) – Self Addressed Stamped Envelope —When asked to include an SASE with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

SASP – Self Addressed Stamped Postcard —When asked to include an SASP with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

second person – Writing that has the “you” viewpoint by addressing the reader. This is common in how-to articles–pieces that give advice or information.

second serial rights – The rights, granted in a contract, that permit the publisher to sell an article to another publication after it has appeared in the first one. These rights are also referred to as reprint rights.

secondary magazine – A medium-sized consumer magazine that focuses on a specific niche, or area of interest, and therefore covers a secondary market. Secondary magazines usually fill the gaps left by large magazines, which try to address the needs of many different kinds of readers.

section editor – An editor in charge of one section of a publication, such as health or books.

serial – A magazine or journal published at regular intervals such as weekly, monthly, or quarterly.  Also called periodical.

Self Addressed Stamped Envelope – When asked to include an SASE with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

Self Addressed Stamped Postcard – When asked to include an SASP with a submission, make sure you use the proper postage. There are different rates for outside the U.S., so check with your post office. Never send money for someone to read your work.

service piece – A consumer-oriented third-person article that falls into the how-to category, but goes further than just explaining how to do something by informing, educating, and advising the audience about an important issue or life skill like investing, working, or making a purchase. A service piece generally runs 500 words in length or more.

sidebar – A short piece that accompanies an article and provides helpful hints, resources, or a summary of the article’s main points. These boxes of information are set apart from the main article and are usually less than 200 words in length.

simultaneous submission – The practice of sending out one article to more than one publication at the same time. This is also called a multiple submission.

slander – A spoken statement that damages a person’s reputation, character, or good name. See also defamation; libel.

slant – The defined approach taken in an article by the writer. Also called an angle, this is one facet of the larger topic on which the writer has chosen to focus.

slush pile – The term used to describe the stack of unsolicited articles–articles that were not requested by an editor. Articles in the slush pile are usually read by an editorial assistant.

solicited (Requested) – A solicited article has been requested by an editor, usually in response to a query letter sent by a freelance writer.

source list – The list of sources used by a writer in researching an article. The list should include contact information for all interview subjects, as well as bibliographic data for each website, book, newspaper, or other publication from which the writer gleaned information for the article. This list is often submitted to the publication’s fact checker so that he can verify all information.

staff reporter – A writer hired by a newspaper to cover a particular beat. In the early days of newspapers, this person was sometimes called a “stringer.”

style sheet – A sheet that details the style and format preferred by a publication. Academic publications usually use either MLA style or APA style. Consumer and trade publications usually prefer either AP style or Chicago style.

submission guidelines – The set of rules for submitting articles to a particular publication. Sometimes referred to as submission guidelines, they provide specific information about formatting, grammar, and style, and also provide payment information and contract terms. It is important to always study a publication’s guidelines before submitting. By writing in the style prescribed by the publication, you can increase your chances of acceptance. Writer’s guidelines can be obtained by directly contacting the publication itself, and in some cases may also be found on the publication’s website or the website of Writer’s Market. See also  writers guidelines.

submission package – A package that is sent by a freelance writer to a publication for the purpose of selling an already-written article to the publication. Generally, this package includes a cover letter; a copy of the article; published clips, if any; and, in the case of an academic article, a curriculum vitae. See also query package.

syndicate – An agency that sells the same article simultaneously to different newspaper outlets. These articles are then printed in numerous publications throughout the country. Most syndicate writers are established experts who have built up years of experience in their chosen area of focus.

      

T

tear-sheet (tearsheet)- An original copy of a printed article “torn” from the publication’s pages. Most editors send writers complete copies of the publication, known as author copies, instead of tear-sheets.

technical article – A third-person article, written for a trade journal, that covers issues which the typical layman’s publication wouldn’t examine in its articles. Technical articles vary in length, depending on the material being covered, and always use industry-specific language.

television, dramatic, and motion picture rights – The right to sell an article or story for dramatic adaptation. Writers who have written human interest articles should try to retain these rights when signing a contract with a publication in case other media representatives are interested in the piece.

text only format – Also known as ASCII format, this format strips a file of all formatting–boldface, italics, etc.–and converts it to a single-spaced, plain document that can be read by most software programs.  You can save a document as text only in MS Word, or use Notepad to create the document.  See ASCII format

theme graph – The paragraph that sums up the general angle of an article, providing the essential points that the piece will cover. This is also referred to as the nut graph or billboard paragraph.

third person – The most distant of all writing forms. In this type of writing, “he,” “she,” and “they” are the pronouns used. Third-person writing is generally employed in objective articles such as news stories and feature articles, and is sometimes used in interview/profile pieces as well. It is appropriate when the writer is trying to present important information or show an unbiased front.

tips article – An article that provides readers with hints and advice in a quick, easy-to-read format. Specifically, these pieces tell the reader how to do something better or more economically. They are common in consumer magazines.

topic – The subject of an article. This should be narrowed and tightened until the writer develops a specific angle that will appeal to the readers of the target publication.

trade journal – A magazine or small newspaper published specifically for people in certain businesses or professions to increase career and business knowledge. Unlike an academic journal, a trade journal is designed to help readers better run their business or perform their job.

    

U

unsolicited – Not requested. An unsolicited article is sent by a freelance writer to a publication without being asked to do so. It then remains in a slush pile until someone–usually an editorial assistant–is able to review it and determine its suitability for the publication.

    

V

No terms at this time.

    

W

website (web-site, web site) – A server computer that makes documents available on the world wide web (www).  Most commonly thought of as a group of informational pages belonging to a person or organization with a domain name [their dot-com address] that are available on the world wide web.  See also our computer terms, jargon and acronyms page.

wire service – A service, such as Associated Press, that electronically distributes news and articles to newspapers and magazines around the country. For many publications, buying a story from a wire service costs a fraction of the price paid to a freelance writer, making wire service stories an economical choice.

word count – The number of words in the article, not including the headline or byline. Because space is such an important commodity in the article world, it is vital to provide the editor with an accurate word count that comes within a few words of the requested count.

work for hire – A contractual arrangement in which the employer or other person or company for whom the writing is prepared is considered the author, and owns all of the rights to the work. Many staff reporters and copywriters sign such contracts, preventing them from reprinting any of the work they produce while employed with that company.

writer’s guidelines – The set of rules for submitting articles to a particular publication. Sometimes referred to as submission guidelines, they provide specific information about formatting, grammar, and style, and also provide payment information and contract terms. It is important to always study a publication’s guidelines before submitting. By writing in the style prescribed by the publication, you can increase your chances of acceptance. Writer’s guidelines can be obtained by directly contacting the publication itself, and in some cases may also be found on the publication’s website or the website of Writer’s Market. See also submission guidelines.

       

X

No terms at this time.

    

Y

No terms at this time.

    

Z

No terms at this time.

    

Resources Menu

Publishers Websites

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Publishers Websites

This list will continue to grow as we receive your links.  As with Editors and Agents links, always Google the agency and see if there are any bad reviews or warnings against the publishing house.

Addicus Books

American-Book Publishing

Arsenal Pulp Press – publisher of literary fiction, westerns, romances, new age, literary and art studies, political/sociological studies, and more.

Ballantine Publishing Group – publisher of sci-fi and fantasy, romance and women’s fiction, mysteries and multicultural titles (Random House).

Bantam Dell

Barbour Publishing

Bethany House

Doubleday Publishing

Harlequin
•  Mills Boon (Harlequin Australia)
•  MIRA
• Check the Series drop-down for the series type

HarperCollins

ImaJinn Books

Kensington – Zebra – Pinnacle Publishing Corporation. – independent full-range publisher of romance, true crime, western, nonfiction and fiction.

Macmillan

MIRA Books (Harlequin)

MIRA UK

Mystic-Ink Publishing

Penguin/Putnam – Penguin Group (USA) publishes under a wide range of prominent imprints and trademarks, among them Viking, G. P. Putnam’s Sons, The Penguin Press, Riverhead Books, Dutton, Penguin Books, Berkley Books, Gotham Books, Portfolio, New American Library, Plume, Tarcher, Philomel, Grosset & Dunlap, Puffin, and Frederick Warne

Publishing Mills AudioBooks – Grammy Award winning audiobook publisher. Catalog includes bestselling fiction, non-fiction, biography, SF, romance, children’s, and more.

Santa Monica Press: Publisher of How-to and Offbeat Books

St. Martin’s Press

Simon & Schuster

Thorndike Press

Tor – Science Fiction / Fantasy

Tyndale House Publishers

Waterbrook Multnomah Publishing – Christian books

Zondervan

Resources Menu

The Great Limbo Mystery Question

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

The Great Limbo Mystery Question

Question:

I published one middle grade novel with a school book fair house.  It was eaten this summer by a bigger school book fair house.  My second novel had been edited.  The art was done.  It was going to press. Kaboom.  The big guy says they bought the boxes but not the rights to unpublished books.  Was my book published?  I got an advance.  The people that bought it do not exist any more (I don’t think).  Shall I try to sell the book to someone else?

— Linda Armstrong  

Answer:

Well Linda it sounds like you have a very frustrating problem.  My advice to you is to write a letter.  You say they told you they did not purchase the unpublished works so I assume you have spoken to someone there either by phone or mail.  In that case write to this person directly, if you haven’t spoken to someone phone and get an editor’s name so it gets addressed to someone directly.

Detail the exact circumstances.  They need to know the name of the book, the editor that purchased your second ms, the exact amount of work that had been done and the size of the advance and ask if they completely bought off the old company or if there is someone else left you should be dealing with.  Then make them two offers.  First tell them you are willing (or maybe interested) in transferring the contract over to their company based on the previously paid advance and the agreed upon royalties (or whatever pay schedule you had).  Go on to explain that if they are not interested in purchasing the ms you would like some sort of release from them.  You could ask for a letter or, personally, I would send a “contract” of sorts and ask them to sign it if they don’t want it.

You will need:

  • the title of the manuscript.
  • a statement that the manuscript had been bought by such and such company which is now owned by this and that company.
  • a statement that this and that company is not interested in maintaining such and such’s contract.
  • a statement that this and that company releases all rights back to yourself (including the work done on it to date) free of charge.
  • a statement that you are free to pursue other publishers with the current ms as it stands now.

I think that should cover most of your tail – if they sign it it is legally binding even if it is only a letter.  You may want to have a lawyer look it over and ok it before you send it out. Once the letter is out stay on their tail, don’t let them dismiss this – it is your livelihood after all – insist that they see to it as soon as possible so you can move on.  I’m sorry I can’t give you an instant answer that will allow you to resell the book immediately but it is better to be safe than sorry in the end.  You may also want to send a carbon copy to the illustrator with a note explaining what you are doing and suggesting he/she does likewise with the art so that a) he gets paid (if he hasn’t already) for his work if they keep the contract or b) you can pitch the book with illustrations once it’s released.

Good luck Linda.  I hope I have been of help to you.   Megan Potter

Resources Menu

Copyright Primer, Know Your Rights

RESOURCES-TIPS: For writers of all genre who want to write, and the readers who love them.

If you can tell stories, create characters, devise incidents, and have sincerity and passion, it doesn't matter a damn how you write.
- Somerset Maugham

All the words I use in my stories can be found in the dictionary -- it's just a matter of arranging them into the right sentences.
- Somerset Maugham

Anecdotes don't make good stories. Generally I dig down underneath them so far that the story that finally comes out is not what people thought their anecdotes were about.
- Alice Munro

If you write one story, it may be bad; if you write a hundred, you have the odds in your favor.
- Edgar Rice Burroughs

Rejection slips, or form letters, however tactfully phrased, are lacerations of the soul, if not quite inventions of the devil -- but there is no way around them.
Isaac Asimov

To write fiction, one need a whole series of inspirations about people in an actual environment, and then a whole lot of work on the basis of those inspirations.
- Aldus Huxley

Get it down.  Take changes.  It may be bad, but it's the only way you can do anything really good.
- William Faulkner

Books aren't written, they're rewritten.  Including our own.  It is one of the hardest things to accept, especially after the seventh rewrite hasn't quite done it.
- Michael Crichton

Any man who keeps working is not a failure.  He may not be a great writer, but if he applies the old-fashioned virtues of hard, constant labor, he'll eventually make some kind of career for himself as a writer.
- Ray Bradbury

Copyright Primer, Know Your Rights

By Linda S. Dupie

When an editor gives you the great news your article or essay is ready for publication; do you know what rights you’re selling? As a young writer knowing your rights is key.

Your work is copyrighted the moment you put your words on paper, meaning you own the rights to your work. You have full control over how you want your work used. When you agree to have your work published, you are granting the editor certain rights to use it, therefore it is important to understand what rights you are authorizing the editor to use.

Types of Rights

  • First Serial Rights-First serial rights means the writer (you) are giving a newspaper or magazine the right to publish the article, story or poem for the first time in any periodical. You retain all other rights to the material. North American is often added to the phrase to define the geographical location.
  • One-time Rights-This is where the editor buys nonexclusive rights to publish your work once (also known as simultaneous rights). With one-time rights, you are free to try to sell your work to other publications at the same time.
  • Second Serial (Reprint) Rights-Reprint rights give you the opportunity to sell your work to another publication after it has already appeared in another newspaper or magazine. Second serial rights are nonexclusive-therefore you’re able to license the article to more than one market.
  • All Rights-This is just what it sounds like; you are giving up the rights to use this article forever. The publication that buys the article, story, or poem is now the owner of the article.
  • Electronic Rights-These rights cover a wide range of electronic media, from online magazines to CD-ROM magazines. Many print magazines have online media and it would be wise to check the contract to see what if any electronic rights you are selling.

Copyright

Copyright laws protect creators of original stories and articles. There is no need to register your work with the Copyright Office in order for it to be copyrighted. As said above you hold the copyright the moment you put your words on paper. However, registering your work does offer additional protection if you suspect an infringement on your copyright.

Remember a copyright protects your actual form of expression, not titles, ideas, and facts.

You may obtain more information about copyright from the Copyright Office, Library of Congress, Washington DC 20559. You can also visit The Library of Congress web site at http://lcweb.loc.gov/copyright.

Other Resources

Every Writer’s Guide to Copyright and Publishing Law; Second Edition, by Ellen M. Kozak. Published by Owl Books, 1990, 1996.

Writer’s Market, published by Writer’s Digest. (Annually)

The Market Guide for Young Writers, 5th Edition, by Kathy Henderson. Published by Writer’s Digest Books.

Web Site Resources

Writer’s Digest Online  http://www.writersdigest.com

Writing-World.com  http://www.writing-world.com/

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